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This project examined the evidence for Chalcolithic (or Terminal Neolithic) and Early Bronze Age mortuary practices in Northeast England (c. 2500-1500 BC) using the records of mortuary deposits from nineteenth and twentieth century AD excavations. The research involved the acquisition and analysis of detailed contextual information on 355 mortuary deposits from 150 different sites in the region. This archive consists of a dataset derived from existing publications and grey literature on these mortuary deposits, combined with summarised results from the osteological assessment or re-assessment of human remains from the period currently curated by Tyne and Wear Museums, and radiocarbon dating of selected remains from those collections (see Gamble and Fowler in press).
Illustration for item August 2014: ADS-easy novelty usb giveaway!

August 2014: ADS-easy novelty usb giveaway!

ADS are giving away five of our new novelty ‘trowel’ usb memory sticks to the depositors of the next five completed ADS-easy archives. Archives must have been begun on or after August 18th 2014. Winners will be announced as their new archive goes live on the ADS website. Get depositing to be in for a chance to win! And keep an eye out for Internet Archaeology giveaways too.

ADS are giving away five of our new novelty ‘trowel’ usb memory sticks to the depositors of the next five completed ADS-easy archives. Archives must have been begun on or after August 18th 2014. Winners will be announced as their new archive goes live on the ADS website. Get depositing to be in for a chance to win! And keep an eye out for Internet Archaeology giveaways too.

Illustration for item July 2014: PhD in Digital Heritage

July 2014: PhD in Digital Heritage

The University of York is delighted to announce two fully funded studentships for a joint PhD programme in Digital Heritage offered by the Universities of York and Aarhus starting in January 2015. The studentships are part of an exciting new collaborative PhD scheme between the two universities. One PhD studentship will be hosted by York and one by Aarhus, with each student also spending at least... more

The University of York is delighted to announce two fully funded studentships for a joint PhD programme in Digital Heritage offered by the Universities of York and Aarhus starting in January 2015. The studentships are part of an exciting new collaborative PhD scheme between the two universities. One PhD studentship will be hosted by York and one by Aarhus, with each student also spending at least a year at the partner university. Each programme will be for three years, full-time. Both students will be enrolled in the joint doctoral programme of Aarhus and York and will be based within and jointly supervised at the Centre for Digital Heritage at the University of York and Archaeology at Aarhus University.

Illustration for item July 2014: Making Place for a Viking Fortress

July 2014: Making Place for a Viking Fortress

This new article in Internet Archaeology revisits the archaeology of the Viking-age settlement and ring fortress at Aggersborg, Denmark, based on a large-scale geophysical survey using magnetic gradiometry and ground-penetrating radar, as well as legacy excavation data. Late 10th-century Aggersborg, the largest known fortress in Viking-age Scandinavia, commanded a key position at the narrow strai... more

This new article in Internet Archaeology revisits the archaeology of the Viking-age settlement and ring fortress at Aggersborg, Denmark, based on a large-scale geophysical survey using magnetic gradiometry and ground-penetrating radar, as well as legacy excavation data. Late 10th-century Aggersborg, the largest known fortress in Viking-age Scandinavia, commanded a key position at the narrow strait of the Limfjord, a principal sailing route between the Baltic and the North Sea. Previous excavations established that this location was on the site of an earlier settlement, which was burned-down prior to the construction of the fortress. The character and extent of this prior activity, however, have hitherto remained ill-defined.

Illustration for item July 2014: Help us redesign the ADS Guidelines for Depositors

July 2014: Help us redesign the ADS Guidelines for Depositors

ADS are refreshing our Guidelines for Depositors. A new interface will be designed after consultation with users on the most intuitive and instructive way to present the guidelines. To take part in redesign process and have your say complete the survey! By taking part you can also WIN a trowel shaped USB memory stick or £70 worth of Amazon vouchers.

ADS are refreshing our Guidelines for Depositors. A new interface will be designed after consultation with users on the most intuitive and instructive way to present the guidelines. To take part in redesign process and have your say complete the survey! By taking part you can also WIN a trowel shaped USB memory stick or £70 worth of Amazon vouchers.

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