Bishop's Court Extension, Sidmouth Road, Exeter, Devon. Archaeological Excavation (OASIS ID: acarchae2-288547)

AC Archaeology Ltd, 2018

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EX5 4LQ
Devon

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1046752
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AC Archaeology Ltd (2018) Bishop's Court Extension, Sidmouth Road, Exeter, Devon. Archaeological Excavation (OASIS ID: acarchae2-288547) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1046752

Introduction

Bishop's Court Extension, Sidmouth Road, Exeter, Devon. Archaeological Excavation (OASIS ID: acarchae2-288547)

An archaeological excavation in advance of residential development on land at the Bishop’s Court Extension, Sidmouth Road, Exeter (NGR SX 9616 9120), was undertaken by AC archaeology during September and October 2016. The excavation area covered c. 0.35 hectares and was positioned in the northwest part of an overgrown field targeting the location of Romano-British occupation identified by a previous archaeological trench evaluation.

The excavation revealed limited evidence for prehistoric activity, with a possible storage pit and residual Late Iron Age pottery sherds recovered from Romano-British features. The main phase of activity identified was of Romano-British date. Two possible post built structures and two ovens were identified and these may represent an area adjacent to a farmstead. A moderate-sized assemblage of Romano-British pottery, largely comprising coarse wares, certainly dates activity on the site to the 1st to 2nd centuries AD, but probably not continuing beyond the early 3rd century. A small assemblage of Roman tile and related forms indicates that a building with a tiled roof and underfloor heating system may be present in the vicinity, but certainly not on the current site. Part of a field system was exposed. The final phase of activity recorded dated to the post-medieval/modern periods in the form of a quarry pit probably of late 19th century date and two former field boundary ditches.