Roman Amphorae: a digital resource

University of Southampton, 2005 (updated 2014)

Data copyright © University of Southampton unless otherwise stated


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Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1028192
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University of Southampton (2014) Roman Amphorae: a digital resource [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1028192

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Opaiţ E4



Distinctive Features

This type has a quite distinctive body shape. From the short conical neck, the shoulders slope outwards to form the widest part of the amphora, before turning almost at right angles. The body, which is covered in rilling, then tapers sharply and regularly downwards. The base is almost flat, with a point in the middle. The handles attach halfway down the shoulder and below the simple, slightly everted rim.
See characteristics

Date Range

This amphora shape was also well known in the Phoenician area during the late first century BC and early first century AD (Berlin, 1997: 158, PW 497-8, Pl.60).
Some amphora rims discovered at Beirut, dated in the second century AD, and considered as being 'Coan imitation' (Reynolds, 2000: 394, Nos. 41, 42, Fig. 8/41-2) show a conspicuous resemblance to the rim fragments discovered in Dobrudja.
It is also found in the south at Quasrawet, where it is dated to the late fourth century AD (Arthur & Oren, 1998: 201, Fig. 7/2);
Search: [1st century BC] [1st century AD] [2nd century AD] [3rd century AD] [4th century AD]

Origin

If the parallels are correctly established with the sherds discovered at Beirut and Tel Anafa, we could assume that this amphora type has an origin in the Syro-Palestinian region.
Search: [Palestine] [The Levant]

Distribution

A completely preserved amphora was discovered at Iatrus (Böttger, 1982: 47-8, Type 2-2, Pl. 23.276).
It occurs in Dobrudja at Topraichioi and Troesmis (Opaiţ, 1991c: 220, type E4, Pl. 26.4). It is also found in the south at Quasrawet, where it is dated to the late fourth century AD (Arthur & Oren, 1998: 201, Fig. 7/2);
Some amphora rims discovered at Beirut, dated in the second century AD, and considered as being 'Coan imitation' (Reynolds, 2000: 394, Nos. 41, 42, Fig. 8/41-2) show a conspicuous resemblance to the rim fragments discovered in Dobrudja.
This amphora shape was also well known in the Phoenician area during the late first century BC and early first century AD (Berlin, 1997: 158, PW 497-8, Pl.60).
Search: [Black Sea] [Lebanon] [The Levant]

Contents

In view of the hardness of the fabric and the ovoid shape of the body it is quite possible that this amphora was used for olive oil.

Calculations made for the amphora discovered at Quasrawet indicate a capacity of c. 18 litres.

Comments

Principal contributor: Andrei Opaiţ