A9 Dualling Programme: Pass of Birnam to Glen Garry - Stage 3 (OASIS ID: aocarcha1-287019)

Alistair Galt, Kimberley Teale, Geneveive Shaw, 2017

Data copyright © AOC Archaeology Group unless otherwise stated


AOC Archaeology Group logo

Primary contact

Alistair Galt
Project Supervisor (Geophysics)
Geophysics
AOC Archaeology Group
The Raylor Centre
James Street
York
YO10 3DW
England

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1045806
Sample Citation for this DOI

Alistair Galt, Kimberley Teale, Geneveive Shaw (2017) A9 Dualling Programme: Pass of Birnam to Glen Garry - Stage 3 (OASIS ID: aocarcha1-287019) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1045806

Introduction

A9 Dualling Programme: Pass of Birnam to Glen Garry - Stage 3 (OASIS ID: aocarcha1-287019)

AOC Archaeology Group was commissioned by Jacobs UK Limited, on behalf of Transport Scotland with Perth and Kinross Council as the Curator, to undertake an archaeological geophysical (gradiometer) survey to investigate the potential for buried archaeological remains along the proposed A9 Dualling Southern Section (from NO 00252 47094 to NN 94600 56785).

A total of thirteen parcels of land were outlined for geophysical survey, covering an area of approximately 16.05 hectares. Three parcels were located in arable fields, with another in scrub land and the rest on grazed pasture, some containing livestock. The results of the survey located a number of discrete trends and anomalies that are likely to be archaeological in origin. These include some rectilinear and curvilinear trends that could represent enclosures, as well as some pit-like features.