Archaeology in Schools: Bedfordshire

Anna Slowikowski, Albion Archaeology, 2009

Data copyright © Albion Archaeology unless otherwise stated


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Anna Slowikowski
Albion Archaeology
St Mary's Church
St Mary's Street
Bedford
MK42 0AS
UK

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1000166
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Anna Slowikowski, Albion Archaeology (2009) Archaeology in Schools: Bedfordshire [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000166

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Introduction

The Archaeology in Schools: Bedfordshire project was undertaken by Albion Archaeology and funded through the English Heritage distributed Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund. This project sought to bring the archaeology uncovered as a result of aggregates extraction to the people of Bedfordshire (County of Bedfordshire and its districts, and Luton unitary). The main focus was children and young people, in the first instance, and was delivered primarily, but not exclusively, through the schools.

Among the many aggregates extraction sites in Bedfordshire, two sites, Willington Quarry and Grove Priory, were the main focus of this project. Both are in different parts of Bedfordshire. Willington Quarry in north Beds, near Bedford, provided material covering the Roman period, and Grove Priory, in south Bedfordshire, near Leighton Buzzard, provided material covering the Anglo-Saxon and medieval periods. Ultimately, the delivery of this project was county-wide, so that the archaeological results of aggregate extraction could be seen to benefit all Bedfordshire and Luton people, not just those who live in close proximity to a quarry.