Water Pipeline Replacement Works, Rainbow Hill, Worcester. Archaeological Observation (OASIS ID: borderar1-289629)

Border Archaeology, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1049647
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Border Archaeology (2018) Water Pipeline Replacement Works, Rainbow Hill, Worcester. Archaeological Observation (OASIS ID: borderar1-289629) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1049647

Introduction

Water Pipeline Replacement Works, Rainbow Hill, Worcester. Archaeological Observation (OASIS ID: borderar1-289629)

Border Archaeology Ltd (BAL) was commissioned by Amey Construction Ltd on behalf of Severn Trent Water to undertake a programme of Archaeological Observation in connection with approximately 800m of water pipeline replacement works in Worcester affecting Rainbow Hill, Lansdowne Crescent Lane, Lansdowne Walk, part of Lansdowne Crescent and Roger's Hill. These streets all lay in an area with the potential to encounter deposits of Roman, medieval and Civil War date.

The majority of the work was carried out by means of open-cut trenching, with some sections employing trenchless pipe-bursting, involving the excavation of access-pits. In addition, a number of initial trial-pits were excavated to locate services and mains.

All features and deposits encountered during the course of the engineering groundworks related to modern road surfaces and existing pipes and services. The open-cut trenching largely followed the route of an existing cast-iron main and any archaeological features or deposits which may have been present would probably have been damaged prior to commencement of the present scheme.

Although areas of natural clay were revealed, particularly on Rainbow Hill and Lansdowne Walk, no evidence of archaeological features or early road surfaces was present and it would appear likely that these must have been removed during construction of the existing road. However, the fact that no residual finds or material were seen suggests that archaeological activity in this area was limited and that, prior to residential development in the 19th century and subsequently, it may have lain under cultivation.

The reported discovery of musket balls, clay pipe and a stamped silver coin on allotments at the northeast end of Lansdowne Walk may relate to the Civil War period but no evidence for features or deposits of that date was seen in the nearby access pits.