South Stand, City Stadium, Filbert Street, Leicester. Historic Building Recording

Birmingham Archaeology, 2017

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Birmingham Archaeology (2017) South Stand, City Stadium, Filbert Street, Leicester. Historic Building Recording [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1046287

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Introduction

South Stand, City Stadium, Filbert Street, Leicester. Historic Building Recording

In May 2003 Birmingham University Field Archaeology Unit (BUFAU) was commissioned by DearsBrack to prepare an archive report on the south stand of the City Stadium, the former ground of Leicester City Football Club, situated on Filbert Street just to the south of the city centre (NGR SK 58130278). The work was based on a series of digital images of the City Stadium taken by the developers prior to the demolition of the stadium buildings.

The south stand was built in 1927 to the design of Sir E. O. Williams and D. J. Moss, and was a substantial double decker grandstand of brick, concrete and steel construction, that drew on the pioneering work of the engineer Archibald Leitch, and which embodied the more architectural approach to stadium design that was current in the 1920s and 1930s.