AS Rolling Mills, Cradely Heath, Sandwell, West Midlands. Historic Building Recording

Birmingham Archaeology, 2017

Data copyright © University of Birmingham unless otherwise stated


Historic England logo

Primary contact

Historic England
1 Waterhouse Square
138-142 Holborn
London
EC1N 2ST
UK
Tel: 01793 414700
Fax: 01793 414707

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1046286
Sample Citation for this DOI

Birmingham Archaeology (2017) AS Rolling Mills, Cradely Heath, Sandwell, West Midlands. Historic Building Recording [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1046286

Birmingham Archaeology logo
University of Birmingham logo

Introduction

AS Rolling Mills, Cradely Heath, Sandwell, West Midlands. Historic Building Recording

In August 2007, Birmingham Archaeology carried out a programme of historic building recording and analysis on AS Rolling Mills, 75 Lower High Street, Cradley Heath (NGR SO 9400 8581) in advance of the redevelopment of the site. The buildings were recorded at a variety of levels from Level 1 to 3 dependent on their period and style. The site showed continued development from late 19th-century beginnings through to the late 20th century. The buildings surveyed were typical of their type and age, showing no particular architectural flair or significance, having been constructed for purely functional purposes. However, the continued usage of the site, and its constructional history make it a prime example of the industrial development of this area of Cradley Heath and the Black Country during the 19th and 20th centuries.