Land off Queen Street and Meeting Street, Wednesbury, Sandwell; An Archaeological Evaluation 2007

Birmingham Archaeology, 2016

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Birmingham Archaeology (2016) Land off Queen Street and Meeting Street, Wednesbury, Sandwell; An Archaeological Evaluation 2007 [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1038416

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Introduction

Land off Queen Street and Meeting Street, Wednesbury, Sandwell; An Archaeological Evaluation 2007

An archaeological evaluation of land off Queen Street and Meeting Street, Wednesbury, Sandwell (centred on NGR SO 9820 9580) was undertaken by Birmingham Archaeology in October 2007. The evaluation took place in advance of a proposed residential development and was sited to provide data concerning the development of Wednesbury from the medieval period to the present and, more specifically, to locate and record the remains of a Wesleyan Methodist chapel (SMR 13091) built in 1850 that stood on the site until the 1950s or 1960s.

Three trial-trenches were excavated. A residual Roman pottery sherd was recovered from a pit recorded in one trench close to Meeting Street. This suggested activity possibly relating to the Stretton to Metchley Roman road which is thought to pass through the locality. The pit also contained 17th century pottery, probably locally produced. The function of the pit is unknown, but it could be associated with crafts, industries or agricultural activities which may have been carried out on site, in an area which was probably outside the 17th century town boundary. Alternatively it is perhaps possible that the pit could be evidence of back-plot activity relating to development along Meeting Street in the 17th century. The well preserved vaulted undercroft walls of the Methodist chapel were recorded in another trench which also confirmed the position and alignment of the structure.