Lea Quarries, Much Wenlock, Shropshire: Archaeological Record and Heritage Assessment

Birmingham Archaeology, 2016

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1038418
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Birmingham Archaeology (2016) Lea Quarries, Much Wenlock, Shropshire: Archaeological Record and Heritage Assessment [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1038418

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Introduction

Lea Quarries, Much Wenlock, Shropshire: Archaeological Record and Heritage Assessment

Birmingham Archaeology was commissioned in 2009 by The National Trust (West Midlands Region) to undertake an archaeological record and heritage assessment in respect of the disused Lea Quarries, Much Wenlock, Shropshire (centred on NGR SO 59348 98330), to inform discussions regarding the possible future use of the quarry.

Wenlock Edge forms a limestone escarpment, approximately 24km long and aligned north-east to south-west between the settlements of Much Wenlock and Craven Arms in South Shropshire. The characteristic formation has been formed by the weathering of a bed of Silurian limestone which is underlain and covered by the Wenlock and Lower Ludlow shales respectively. The bed is inclined to the south-east, with a gentle slope in this direction while the face of the scarp is formed by the limestone itself, presenting an almost natural quarry face.