CBA Occasional Papers

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Survey and policy of field research in the archaeology of Great Britain. I The prehistoric and Early Historic Ages to the 7th Century AD

Christopher Hawkes and Stuart Piggot (Editors)


CBA Occasional Papers No. 1 (1948)


Abstract

Title page of report 1

The object of this booklet is to consider briefly the present state and future direction of British field research in archaeology, for the Prehistoric and Early Historic periods which may conveniently be taken together to form a first Part of such a work. It will be followed in due course by a second Part, which will cover likewise the later Pre-Conquest, Medieval, and Post-Medieval periods.

It is hoped that both as a survey and a policy it will form a convenient starting-point and directive for the resumption of field research now that the war is over; and in particular, that it will be found of use for action in the period of national re-planning and reconstruction now beginning, in which many sites and antiquities throughout the country may require investigation, protection, and excavation for the preserving of their value for the public interest.

The work was begun at the request of the Research Committee of the Congress of Archaeological Societies, and has been completed, since the termination of the Congress's existence in 1945, under the auspices of the Council for British Archaeology, with the aid of moneys transmitted by the Congress, at its last meeting, to the Council for this purpose.


Contents

  • Title pages and preface
  • Introduction (pp 9-11)
  • Chapter 1 - Survey of the Present Position in British Prehistoric and Early Historic Archeology
    • The Palaeolithic Age
      • Introduction: the 'Eolithic question (pp 13-14)
      • A. Geological aspects (pp 14-18)
      • B. Archaeological aspects (pp 19-25)
    • The Mesolithic Age
      • A. General and environmental (pp 26-27)
      • B. Archaeological (pp 27-28)
    • The Neolithic Age (beginning about 2500 B.C.) (pp 28-31)
      • The Bronze Age
      • The Early Bronze Age (beginning about 1900-1800 B.C.) (pp 32-35)
      • The Middle Bronze Age (beginning about 1400 B.C.) (pp 35-36)
      • The Late Bronze Age (beginning about 1000 B.C.) (pp 36-40)
      • General (pp 40-41)
    • The Early Iron Age
      • Iron Age A (beginning about 450-400 B.C.) (pp 41-45)
      • Iron Age B (beginning at regionally various dates, from about 250 B.C.) (pp 45-52)
      • Iron Age C (beginning about 75 and 50 B.C.) (pp 52-55)
      • Industry and trade (pp 55-56)
    • The Age of the Roman Occupation
      • A. The military zone of Roman Britain (pp 57-62)
      • B. The civil area of Roman Britain (pp 62-67)
      • C. Scotland outside the Roman Frontier (p 68)
    • The Post-Roman and Anglo-Saxon Age, to the Seventh Century
      • A. Scotland (pp 68-69)
      • B. Wales (pp 69-72)
      • C. 'Sub-Roman' Britain (pp 72-74)
      • D. Anglo-Saxon England (pp 75-78)
  • Chapter II - Outstanding Problems in British Prehistoric and Early Historic Archaeology: Policy and Recommendations for Field Research
    • The Palaeolithic Age
      • The 'Eolithic question' (p 79)
      • A. Geological aspects (pp 79-80)
      • B. Archaeological aspects (pp 80-82)
    • The Mesolithic Age (pp 83-84)
    • The Neolithic Age (pp 84-88)
    • The Bronze Age (pp 88-93)
    • The Early Iron Age (pp 94-99)
    • The Age of the Roman Occupation
      • A. The military zone of Roman Britain (pp 100-102)
      • B. The civil area of Roman Britain (pp 102-104)
      • C. Scotland outside the Roman Frontier (pp 104-107)
    • The Post-Roman and Anglo-Saxon Age, to the Seventh Century
      • A. Scotland (p 107)
      • B. Wales (pp 108-111)
      • C. 'Sub-Roman' Britain (pp 111-112)
      • D. Anglo-Saxon England (pp 112-120)

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    Survey and policy of field research in the archaeology of Great Britain. I The prehistoric and Early Historic Ages to the 7th Century AD (CBA Occassional Papers 1) PDF 1 Mb