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The archaeology of Roman London, Volume 3: Public Buildings in the South-West Quarter of Roman London

Tim Williams

CBA Research Report No 88 (1993)

ISBN 0 906780 98 5


Abstract

Title page of report 88

Excavations in 1981 and 1986 revealed massive Roman foundations in the waterfront area of the south-west quarter of the City of London, and also shed light on earlier observations made during the 19th and early 20th centuries. Together these have provided the evidence for at least two periods of major public works within the south-west quarter of the late Roman walled town.

This building programme appears to have been the last flourishing of the so-called 'British Empire'. Parallels in military architecture suggest that military engineers, if not labour, had been diverted to the task from the Saxon Shore forts. It is unlikely that the complex was purely military itself, being situated upstream of the bridge and being poorly positioned to defend London, but the monumental size of the construction, and the elaborate nature of its preparation, suggest that it was intended to form an impressive monument within the urban landscape, dominating the riverfront.

Contents

  • Title pages
  • Contents (pp v-viii)
  • List of figures (pp viii-ix)
  • List of plates (p ix)
  • Acknowledgments (p x)
  • Summary (p xi)
  • Drawing conventions (p xiv)
  • Part I: Introduction
    • Previous work in the area (pp 1-2)
    • Organisation of the report (pp 3-6)
    • Geological and topographical background (p 6)
  • Part II: Discussion
    • 1. The Period I complex (?1st to the 3rd century)
      • 1. Introduction (p 7)
      • 2. The construction of the complex (p 7)
      • 3. Layout (pp 7-8)
      • 4. Extent (p 8)
      • 5. Dating (p 8)
      • 6. Discussion (pp 8-12)
    • 2. The Period II complex (late 3rd century)
      • 1. Introduction (p 13)
      • 2. The riverside wall (pp 13-14)
      • 3. The construction of the complex (pp 14-21)
      • 4. Construction methods and their parallels (pp 21-24)
      • 5. Layout (pp 24-26)
      • 6. Extent (pp 26-27)
      • 7. Dating (p 27)
      • 8. The intended appearance of the complex (pp 27-28)
      • 9. The function of the Period II complex (pp 28-32)
      • 10. The end of the Period II complex and later Roman activity (p 32)
    • 3. Discussion: the south-west quarter - development and context (pp 33-38)
  • Part III: The archaeological evidence
    • 4. Peter's Hill
      • 1. The site (p 39)
      • 2. The Excavation (pp 39-54)
      • 3. Dating discussion (pp 54-56)
    • 5. Sunlight Wharf
      • 1. The Site (p 57)
      • 2. The Excavation (pp 57-62)
      • 3. Dating discussion (p 62)
    • 6. Salvation Army Headquarters
      • 1. The Site (p 63)
      • 2. Observations at the Salvation Army Headquarters. Report by Peter Marsden (pp 63-69)
      • 3. Dating discussion (p 69)
      • 4. Additional comments (pp 69-71)
    • 7. Earlier Observations
      • 1. Observation 6: Peter's Hill (p 72)
      • 2. Observation 7: Lambeth Hill (pp 72-74)
      • 3. Observation 8:Brook's Yard (pp 74-75)
      • 4. Observation 9: Old FIsh Street Hill (p 76)
      • 5. Observation 10: Lambeth Hill (p 76)
      • 6. Observation 11: Fye Foot Lane (pp 76-77)
      • 7. Observation 12-24: Knightrider Street (pp 77-83)
      • 8. Dating discussion (pp 83-84)
      • 9. General discussion (pp 84-86)
      • 10. Conclusions (pp 86-87)
    • 8. Other evidence for public monuments in the area
      • 1. Building material redeposited during the construction of the Period II complex at Peter's Hill (pp 88-89)
      • 2. Re-used masonary in the Period II complex foundations (pp 89-90)
      • 3. Re-used masonary in the 4th century riverside wall at Baynard's Castle (pp 90-91)
    • 9. Correlation of earlier observations with the Period II complex
      • 1. Peter's Hill and Sunlight Wharf (p 93)
      • 2. Salvation Army Headquarters (Phase 2) (p 93)
      • 3. Observation 7 (pp 93-94)
      • 4. Observation 9 (p 94)
      • 5. Observation 11 (p 94)
  • APPENDIX 1: tree-ring dating of oak timbers from Peter's Hill and Sunlight Wharf, by Jennifer Hillman (pp 95-99)
  • APPENDIX 2: the building material, by Ian Betts (pp 99-101
  • APPENDIX 3: timber supplies (pp 101-102)
  • APPENDIX 4: Archive Reports - availability (p 102)
  • APPENDIX 5: Site numbering (pp 102-103)
  • Bibliography (pp 104-106)
  • Index, by L and R Adkins (107-108)

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