Fields for Discourse: Landscape and Materialities of Being in South and West Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire during the Iron Age and Romano-British Periods. A Study of People and Place: PhD Thesis, University of Wales, Newport (2010)

Adrian Chadwick, 2010

Data copyright © Dr Adrian Chadwick unless otherwise stated


University of Wales, Newport logo

Primary contact

Dr Adrian Chadwick
University of Wales, Newport
19 Kensington Place
Newport
NP19 8GP
Wales

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1000124
Sample Citation for this DOI

Adrian Chadwick (2010) Fields for Discourse: Landscape and Materialities of Being in South and West Yorkshire and Nottinghamshire during the Iron Age and Romano-British Periods. A Study of People and Place: PhD Thesis, University of Wales, Newport (2010) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000124

Abstract

Cropmarks north-east of Scabba Wood, Sprotbrough, S. Yorks

This slightly modified PhD thesis is an interpretative study of the rural landscapes and communities of Nottinghamshire and South and West Yorkshire during the Iron Age and Romano-British periods. It focuses on the regional evidence for inhabitation, much of it consisting of cropmarks of field systems and enclosures, which remained relatively unknown until the late 1970s. These landscapes and their inhabitants are still rarely discussed outside of the region, and have not previously been interpreted from a social perspective. This study utilises the results of aerial photographic studies and developer-funded investigations, many previously unpublished or only available as so-called 'grey literature'; and provides the first comprehensive gazetteer of this evidence.

This study assesses the current known extent of these enclosures and field systems, and suggests reasons for their development, physical layout and purpose. It extends and develops theories evolved in landscape archaeology, social geography, anthropology and critical social theory to write fine-grained histories for the people who once inhabited this region. The nature of everyday life, small-scale communities, field systems and boundaries, agricultural practices and daily routines, human-animal relations, depositional practice, consumption studies, Roman imperialism and 'Romanisation' are amongst the themes used to explore the evidence.