Land at Pitt Vale, Winchester, Hampshire. Archaeological Evaluation. (OASIS ID: cotswold2-228913)

Cotswold Archaeology, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1047207
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Cotswold Archaeology (2018) Land at Pitt Vale, Winchester, Hampshire. Archaeological Evaluation. (OASIS ID: cotswold2-228913) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1047207

Introduction

Land at Pitt Vale, Winchester, Hampshire. Archaeological Evaluation. (OASIS ID: cotswold2-228913)

An archaeological evaluation comprising the excavation of 61 trial trenches was undertaken by Cotswold Archaeology in November 2014 at Pitt Vale, Winchester, Hampshire on land proposed for residential development.

The evaluation has been able to identify a small concentration of archaeology in the form of ditches within the south-western part of the site. It is unclear to what these features may relate, but the ditches would appear to be aligned to one another and may form part of an earlier field system that based on the pottery evidence dates to the medieval period. Although a number of postholes were also recorded the low level of cultural material recovered is not indicative of concentrated domestic or industrial activity.

Across the remainder of the site there is a general spread of archaeological features, but they remain undated and there is the possibility that some of the features may relate to World War I camp activity although the archive evidence suggests that the camps did not extend into the site. A large number of tree throws were also recorded across the site.

The evaluation was also able to further identify colluvial layers within a dry valley, which had been previously identified on a neighbouring site. Geoarchaeological investigation indicated that the dry valley has acted as a basin of deposition for colluvial sediments locally derived from upslope.