Former Ford Factory, Wide Lane, Swaythling, Southampton. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: cotswold2-268163)

Cotswold Archaeology, 2016

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1040802
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Cotswold Archaeology (2016) Former Ford Factory, Wide Lane, Swaythling, Southampton. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: cotswold2-268163) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1040802

Introduction

Former Ford Factory, Wide Lane, Swaythling, Southampton. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: cotswold2-268163)

An archaeological evaluation was undertaken by Cotswold Archaeology in August and September 2016 at part of the Former Ford Factory, Wide Lane, Southampton.

The evaluation uncovered the natural horizon across the site as brickearth deposits overlying river gravels. The brickearth had survived in most areas, apart from where modern development had caused localised truncation. The absence of buried topsoil/subsoil overlying the brickearth suggests that it was probably truncated in the 1930s during the initial development of the site. However, the levels of the surviving brickearth deposits correspond with the slope of the surrounding topography (to the south-east) and suggest that this disturbance was minimal.

During the evaluation, the demolished remains of two World War II air raid shelters were uncovered along the southern and western boundaries of the site. No further archaeological remains or deposits were uncovered.