Stocklake Urban Improvement Scheme, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: cotswold2-289396)

Cotswold Archaeology, 2017

Data copyright © Cotswold Archaeology unless otherwise stated


Cotswold Archaeology logo

Primary contact

Hazel O'Neill
Cotswold Archaeology
Building 11
Kemble Enterprise Park
Cirencester
GL7 6BQ
UK
Tel: 01285 772624

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1044398
Sample Citation for this DOI

Cotswold Archaeology (2017) Stocklake Urban Improvement Scheme, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: cotswold2-289396) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1044398

Introduction

Stocklake Urban Improvement Scheme, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: cotswold2-289396)

Between February and April 2016, Cotswold Archaeology carried out an archaeological watching brief during the Stocklake Urban Improvement Scheme, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire. The Buckinghamshire Historic Environment Record (HER) shows that there have been numerous artefacts dating to the Roman period (AD 43 to AD 410) recovered from within the immediate vicinity of the site, which follows the route of the former Aylesbury to Cheddington railway line.

Archaeological features encountered during the watching brief were confined to the western part of the site and ranged in date from the Late Iron Age to the modern period. The earliest identified features included the well-preserved remains of ditched enclosures or field systems, containing Late Iron Age to 1st century AD pottery. Overlying and partially obscuring these earlier features was a further series of enclosures or field systems, dating from the 2nd to 4th-century AD. To the immediate east of this activity the watching brief also identified a number of predominantly undated, but probable Roman features, within an area designated for in situ preservation. Interpretation of the remains was constrained by the narrow width of the site, which revealed only a narrow corridor through the Iron Age/Romano-British ditch system. It is likely that the remains form part of a small farmstead, one of a number that have been identified elsewhere in the general area.