Land at Chapel Gover, Newquay, Cornwall. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: cotswold2-305783)

Cotswold Archaeology, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1047622
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Cotswold Archaeology (2018) Land at Chapel Gover, Newquay, Cornwall. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: cotswold2-305783) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1047622

Introduction

Land at Chapel Gover, Newquay, Cornwall. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: cotswold2-305783)

In June 2017, Cotswold Archaeology carried out an archaeological evaluation of land at Chapel Gover, Newquay, Cornwall. A total of 10 trenches was excavated within the site. The evaluation identified a series of ditches and a single possible posthole at the site, as well as a localised area of furrows.

The posthole and six of the ditches were cut into the natural substrate and sealed by the subsoil. These ditches do not correspond to any field boundaries shown on 19th and 20th century cartographic sources, although they are all on the same broad alignment as the extant field system and may therefore represent elements (e.g. former boundaries and/or drainage ditches) which were lost pre-1839. A single sherd of Roman pottery was recovered from one of these ditches, although it is possible that this sherd was residual/redeposited.

The remainder of the ditches were cut into the subsoil and sealed by the topsoil, and are therefore probably post-medieval or modern in date. One of these ditches contained a sherd of 19th/20th-century pottery.