Chevithorne Barton, Tiverton, Devon: Historic Building Watching Brief (OASIS ID: cotswold2-309274)

Cotswold Archaeology, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1047199
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Cotswold Archaeology (2018) Chevithorne Barton, Tiverton, Devon: Historic Building Watching Brief (OASIS ID: cotswold2-309274) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1047199

Introduction

Chevithorne Barton, Tiverton, Devon: Historic Building Watching Brief (OASIS ID: cotswold2-309274)

In 2016 Cotswold Archaeology was commissioned to carry out a watching brief on demolition works in the Jacobean house of Chevithorne Barton, nr Tiverton, Devon and to provide a record of any features revealed. This was to fulfil conditions applied by Exeter City Council to Listed Building Consent and Planning Permission granted in 2016 for works of demolition, rebuilding and refurbishment on the site.

The major works were the removal of most of the 19th to 20th century additions to the rear of the house and the provision of new footings to the replacement structures. In addition the 19th/20th century partitions in the 19th-century wing were re-organised and 1930s work was distinguished from the 19th-century works. One section of window reveal panelling was temporarily removed in the Oak Room, allowing a record to be made of the masonry behind it and the details of the joinery. This supported the view that the panelling is later than the date of the house. On the upper floors repair and replacement of floorboards allowed details of the floor beams and joists to be noted. The watching brief results clarified some issues on the structural history of the house and in particular showed that the north wall of the west wing had retained 17th-century fabric in the ground floor and lower part of the first floor. Unfortunately, the removal of 19th- and 20th-century elements here also resulted in the removal of this fabric on the ground floor.