Field House Farm, Ladwell, Hampshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: cotswold2-310642)

Cotswold Archaeology, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1047200
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Cotswold Archaeology (2018) Field House Farm, Ladwell, Hampshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: cotswold2-310642) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1047200

Introduction

Field House Farm, Ladwell, Hampshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: cotswold2-310642)

Archaeological investigations were undertaken at Field House Farm, Ladwell, Hampshire between February and November 2014.

Evidence for occupation dating from the Bronze Age to Post-medieval period was uncovered including a number of substantial ditches of Middle to Late Bronze Age date, suggesting land division in this area but limited further evidence for corresponding settlement. A fragmentary, pegged, leaf-shaped copper-alloy spearhead of Late Bronze Age date was also recovered from the topsoil. Furthermore, a number of fragmentary Iron Age ditches pre-dated a large sub-oval Late Iron Age/Early Roman enclosure on an elevated position in the north of the site. The enclosure dated from the 1st century BC to 2nd century AD, however, features dating to the 3rd to 4th century AD suggest reoccupation of the site later in the Roman period.

A number of post-medieval features were also uncovered that correspond to a small farmstead present on 19th century maps of the area.