Discovering the Ancient Don Gorge

Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery, inHeritage, South Yorkshire Archaeology Service, 2010

Data copyright © Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery, inHeritage unless otherwise stated


Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund logo
English Heritage logo

Primary contact

Peter Robinson
Museum Officer
Archaeology
Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery
Chequer Road
Doncaster
DN1 2AE
UK
Tel: 01302 734290

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1000121
Sample Citation for this DOI

Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery, inHeritage, South Yorkshire Archaeology Service (2010) Discovering the Ancient Don Gorge [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000121

inHeritage logo
South Yorkshire Archaeology Service logo

Introduction

Iron Age sword scabbard mounts (chape and mouth guard) found in the Don Gorge

The Don Gorge is an area of the Magnesian limestone between Doncaster and Mexborough in South Yorkshire that has been a focus for amateur archaeologists and metal detectorists. Their finds range from the Mesolithic to Anglo-Saxon times but have never been the subject of comprehensive analysis or publication.

Discovering the Ancient Don Gorge was delivered by Doncaster Museum and Art Gallery, in partnership with InHeritage, South Yorkshire Archaeology Service and Creswell Heritage Trust, on behalf of The Don Gorge Strategic Partnership. It was successfully completed between July 2007 and February 2008, and delivered a number of educational and innovative outreach products, such as the comic and graphic novel, free myfind postcards, science and archaeology sessions for schools, an interactive website called Yourfind, with an online artefact gallery and web-blog and video diary space for schools, and a travelling exhibition designed to go into libraries and schools in the Don Gorge.