Searching for traces of the Southern Dispersal: environmental and historical research on the evolution of human diversity in southern Asia and Australo-Melanesia

Marta Mirazón Lahr, Mike Petraglia, Stephen Stokes, Julie Field, 2010

Data copyright © Dr Julie Field unless otherwise stated


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https://doi.org/10.5284/1000109
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Marta Mirazón Lahr, Mike Petraglia, Stephen Stokes, Julie Field (2010) Searching for traces of the Southern Dispersal: environmental and historical research on the evolution of human diversity in southern Asia and Australo-Melanesia [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000109

Introduction

EFCHED logo Raster surface of South Asia during OIS 4

This research sought to explore the pattern of population movement (direction, rate, permanency) along a hypothesised route from Africa to Australasia during Oxygen Isotope Stage 4. Using GIS-based analyses and hypothetical models of population movement, potential routes out of East Africa were generated and examined. The goal of these analyses was to assess the viability of particular routes, and consider them in terms of ecological and geographical constraints. As a result, several routes through Africa, Arabia, South Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australasia were proposed and evaluated. These routes have been further examined with regards to archaeological site location, the timing of human presence in South Asia, and biological indicators of human diversity.

Papers produced by the Project

Field, J., Lahr, M. M. 2006: Assessment of the Southern Dispersal: GIS-Based Analyses of Potential Routes at Oxygen Isotopic Stage 4. Journal of World Prehistory 19(1):1-45.

Field, J., Petraglia, M., Lahr, M. M. 2007: Dispersals into and through South Asia during OIS 4: GIS-based routes and environmental considerations. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 26:88-108.