Greenhow Hill Lead Mines Survey

Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Northern Mines Research Society, 2007

Data copyright © Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Northern Mines Research Society unless otherwise stated


Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund logo
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Primary contact

Martin Roe
Project Manager
Meerstone Archaeological Consultancy
1-3 Ashleigh Street
Halifax
HX3 6QZ
UK
Tel: 01422 251237

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1000210
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Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty, Northern Mines Research Society (2007) Greenhow Hill Lead Mines Survey [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000210

Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty logo
Northern Mines Research Society logo

Introduction

Greenhow Hill Village is situated in the Nidderdale Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty in the county of North Yorkshire. The local landscape has a well-documented tradition of mineral and aggregate extraction stretching back to at least the early medieval period. The Greenhow Hill Lead Mines Survey is an English Heritage rebursed Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund Project, commissioned by the Nidderdale AONB and undertaken in part by Martin Roe on behalf of the Northern Mine Research Society.

shaft_mounds

The ALSF project had two main objectives:

  • To undertake an archaeological survey of the landscape around Greenhow Hill Village to create a record of industrial heritage features and to raise awareness of how mineral and aggregate extraction has shaped the landscape.
  • To increase public understanding of the landscape around Greenhow through an interpretive circular walk focussing on Heritage features around the village and extraction site

The archaeological survey has produced a comprehensive report defining the surviving mining remains in the area, with a view for future heritage conservation initiatives. In addition the report includes a number of maps, original photographs and lists of recorded features to create a useful archive for future researchers.