The Clock Hotel, Church Street, Welwyn, Hertfordshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: heritage1-170210)

The Heritage Network, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1048306
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The Heritage Network (2018) The Clock Hotel, Church Street, Welwyn, Hertfordshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: heritage1-170210) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1048306

Introduction

The Clock Hotel, Church Street, Welwyn, Hertfordshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: heritage1-170210)

In order to assess the archaeological potential of the site of a proposed new development at the former Clock Hotel, Welwyn, Hertfordshire, the Heritage Network was commissioned by the developers to undertake a programme of archaeological trial trenching. Documentary and cartographic research demonstrates that the present site lay within a tract of open agricultural land and woodland in the late 19th century. By 1937, several buildings are marked on the site. A swimming pool is shown in the south western corner and an access road runs alongside the eastern boundary. By the end of the 1960s, the buildings on the site were in a similar configuration to the present day.

Seven trial trenches were excavated across the site, revealing modern concrete wall footings and services associated with the former Clock Hotel. No features, deposits or finds predating the 20th century were encountered. Clear evidence that the site had been significantly terraced was also observed along the eastern boundary. This, together with the construction and demolition of the hotel, is likely to have removed any potential archaeological features.