Waterloo Farm, Matching Lane, White Roding, Essex. Historic Building Recording (OASIS ID: heritage1-189851)

The Heritage Network, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1048337
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The Heritage Network (2018) Waterloo Farm, Matching Lane, White Roding, Essex. Historic Building Recording (OASIS ID: heritage1-189851) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1048337

Introduction

Waterloo Farm, Matching Lane, White Roding, Essex. Historic Building Recording (OASIS ID: heritage1-189851)

As the result of an archaeological condition on planning consent for the conversion of a barn at Waterloo Farm, White Roding, the Heritage Network was commissioned to create a record of the building in advance of the works. Documentary evidence has shown that there has been a farmstead on this site since at least the late 16th century. Until the early 19th century this was called Gooses, but the name was probably changed around 1815.

The mapping evidence suggests that the present barn forms the remains of a larger cruciform arrangement, shown on the Tithe map of 1840. Between that date and 1874, the farmyard was remodelled and the south-eastern end, below the porches, was either demolished or moved east to form the north-eastern range to the remodelled farmyard. The observed evidence for the barn suggests that is was originally constructed of reused timbers in the early 19th century. Modern renovation works have included the replacement of the timber framing to the south-western gable and to the roof structure, the re-roofing of the midstrey, to form a pent roof rather than the usual gabled roof and the encasing of the sole-plate in concrete and cement.