St. George's Hill Lawn Tennis Club, Weybridge, Surrey. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: heritage1-259848)

The Heritage Network, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1048319
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The Heritage Network (2018) St. George's Hill Lawn Tennis Club, Weybridge, Surrey. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: heritage1-259848) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1048319

Introduction

St. George's Hill Lawn Tennis Club, Weybridge, Surrey. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: heritage1-259848)

In response to a planning condition on the conversion of two existing grass tennis courts to hard courts at St George's Hill Lawn Tennis Club, Weybridge, Surrey, the Heritage Network was commissioned to undertake a programme of archaeological monitoring of the groundworks. It was considered that the investigation on the present site had the potential to contribute to a greater understanding of the occupation and land use of the hill prior to the medieval period as Iron Age and Anglo-Saxon pottery sherds were recovered when the tennis courts were first established in the earlier half of the 20th century.

The development area has clearly been subject to modern disturbance through extensive terracing and the insertion of services. These undoubtedly relate to the construction and maintenance of the previous grass courts. Two linear features, of probable late post-medieval date, were encountered during the course of the groundworks. These appear to represent former hedge lines, possibly relating to paths marked on late 19th and early 20th century OS mapping. No other features, deposits or artefacts of archaeological significance were observed during the course of this work.