Red House Farm, Potash Lane, Long Marston, Hertfordshire. Archaeological Strip, Map and Sample Investigation (OASIS ID: kdkarcha1-210713)

KDK Archaeology, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1047637
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KDK Archaeology (2018) Red House Farm, Potash Lane, Long Marston, Hertfordshire. Archaeological Strip, Map and Sample Investigation (OASIS ID: kdkarcha1-210713) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1047637

Introduction

Red House Farm, Potash Lane, Long Marston, Hertfordshire. Archaeological Strip, Map and Sample Investigation (OASIS ID: kdkarcha1-210713)

In July 2015 KDK Archaeology Ltd undertook a Strip, Map and Sample investigation at Red House Farm, Potash Lane, Long Marston, Hertfordshire in order to fulfil Condition 6 of the Planning Consent for the development of the site. A total area of 482 square metres; was mechanically stripped under close archaeological supervision in three areas. On the completion of the strip, archaeological features comprising 13 postholes, a demolition layer and a well were revealed within Area 1, six postholes were exposed in Area 2, and no archaeology was observed in Area 3.

The postholes revealed in Area 1 and Area 2 contained fills that were all consistent with modern activity, and due to their linear formations, are most likely various phases of fencing or animal enclosures for the farm. The demolition layer seen in Area 1 can be dated as modern by the London Brick Company bricks used to construct the demolished wall. The brick well also revealed in Area 1 is likely to be earlier, but modern intervention is clear in the use of modern bricks in the upper courses bricks and the presence of the metal sleepers. It is clear from the metal rectangular manhole and surrounding concrete that it was covered in recent history.