Six Tunnels Farm, Gaddesden Row, Hertfordshire. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: kdkarcha1-214660)

KDK Archaeology, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1048363
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KDK Archaeology (2018) Six Tunnels Farm, Gaddesden Row, Hertfordshire. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: kdkarcha1-214660) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1048363

Introduction

Six Tunnels Farm, Gaddesden Row, Hertfordshire. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: kdkarcha1-214660)

In June and July 2015 KDK Archaeology Ltd undertook a programme of archaeological observation at Six Tunnels Farm, Gaddesden Row, Hertfordshire. Six site visits were made during the construction of a new access road to the southeast of the existing house. The general stratigraphy of the site lacks subsoil, suggesting that there has been disturbance in this area, probably as a result of either deep ploughing or general landscaping of the area during the construction of Six Tunnels Farm.

On completion of the strip, one area of rooting, [102], and one tree bole, [104], were uncovered; both contained pottery. The pottery found in rooting [102] is possibly early to mid-Iron Age and as such would represent the first indication of activity from that period in the vicinity. Pottery from tree bole [104] dates from the medieval period, most likely the 14th - 15th century.