Wood House, Maylands Avenue, Hemel Hempstead. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: kdkarcha1-265056)

KDK Archaeology, 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1047595
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KDK Archaeology (2018) Wood House, Maylands Avenue, Hemel Hempstead. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: kdkarcha1-265056) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1047595

Introduction

Wood House, Maylands Avenue, Hemel Hempstead. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: kdkarcha1-265056)

In December 2016, KDK Archaeology Ltd conducted an Archaeological Evaluation of Wood House, Maylands Avenue, Hemel Hempstead, Hertfordshire on behalf of Jarvis Contracting in order to fulfil Conditions 12 and 13 of the Planning Consent for the development of the site. The site is located to the northeast of the town centre, in an area that remained open farmland until the mid-20th century, when the site was developed as part of a factory complex. The evaluation consisted of the excavation of four trenches, all of which uncovered evidence of the mid-20th century factory building that until recently stood on the site, but no evidence of any earlier occupation or activity. This may be due to the fact that any surviving archaeological remains had been truncated during the construction works for the factory, or the site was peripheral to settlement until after the Second World War.