The Lyonesse Project: a study of the coastal and marine environment of the Isles of Scilly (OASIS ID cornwall2-58903)

Dan Charman, Charlie Johns, Kevin Camidge, Peter Marshall, Steve F Mills, Jacqui Mulville, Helen M Roberts, 2014

Data copyright © Cornwall Council, English Heritage unless otherwise stated


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https://doi.org/10.5284/1025045
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Dan Charman, Charlie Johns, Kevin Camidge, Peter Marshall, Steve F Mills, Jacqui Mulville, Helen M Roberts (2014) The Lyonesse Project: a study of the coastal and marine environment of the Isles of Scilly (OASIS ID cornwall2-58903) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1025045

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Introduction

Aerial view of the Isles of Scilly

The Lyonesse Project, a study of the evolution of the coastal and marine environment of the Isles of Scilly, was commissioned by English Heritage and carried out between 2009 and 2013 by Historic Environment Projects, Cornwall Council with a team of specialists from Aberystwyth, Cardiff, Exeter and Plymouth Universities, English Heritage's Scientific Dating Team, volunteers and local experts and enthusiasts from the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Maritime Archaeological Society and the Islands Maritime Archaeology Group.

The project aimed to reconstruct the evolution of the physical environment of Scilly during the Holocene (11,700 cal BP to present), investigate the progressive occupation of this changing coastal landscape by early peoples, explore past and present climate change and sea-level rise, develop geophysical techniques for mapping submerged palaeolandscapes, improve management and promote better understanding of the islands' historic environment and encourage local community engagement with the historic environment.