Newport Medieval Ship

Nigel Nayling, University of Wales Trinity St David, Toby Jones, Newport Museums and Heritage Service, 2014

Data copyright © Newport Museums and Heritage Service unless otherwise stated


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Primary contact

Nigel Nayling
Associate Professor and Senior Lecturer in Archaeology
School of Archaeology, History and Anthropology
University of Wales Trinity St David
Lampeter
Ceredigion
SA48 7ED
Wales

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Nigel Nayling, University of Wales Trinity St David, Toby Jones, Newport Museums and Heritage Service (2014) Newport Medieval Ship [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] (doi:10.5284/1020898)

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Introduction

The Newport Ship.

The Newport Ship is the most substantial late medieval vessel excavated and recovered in Britain. The ship was discovered during development on the west bank of the River Usk in Newport, South Wales in 2002. More than twenty-three metres of the clinker-built ship were recovered, along with significant artefact and environmental assemblages. Finds point to strong Iberian connections during the active life of the ship, which arrived in Newport, in the Severn Estuary, after the spring of AD 1468. The dismantling and recovery of the ship has enabled detailed recording using innovative 3D digital techniques and approaches to hypothetical reconstruction. This archive makes available this digital data along with digitised versions of site records, post-excavation documentation of the ship and specialist reports and catalogues.

Select bibliography

Nayling, N. and Jones, T., 2013, The Newport Medieval Ship, Wales, United Kingdom, International Journal of Nautical Archaeology.

Nayling, N. and Susperregi, J., 2013, Iberian Dendrochronology and the Newport Medieval Ship, International Journal of Nautical Archaeology.