White Hart Hotel, Dorchester on Thames, Oxfordshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: oxfordar1-283600)

Oxford Archaeology (South), 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1047589
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Oxford Archaeology (South) (2018) White Hart Hotel, Dorchester on Thames, Oxfordshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: oxfordar1-283600) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1047589

Introduction

White Hart Hotel, Dorchester on Thames, Oxfordshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: oxfordar1-283600)

The evaluation identified two features possibly representing walls which have been robbed of stone. One of these corresponds closely with the conjectured alignment of the northern defences of the Roman small town. A small number of postholes, a pit and a ditch were revealed, broadly dating to the post-medieval period, although two produced Roman pottery which was almost certainly residual. These appear to represent light-weight structures, possibly associated with horticultural activity within the back garden of properties fronting the High Street to the west.

A sequence of layers were identified containing a significant percentage of mortar. These probably relate to construction, modification or demolition of a building within the vicinity in the 18th and 19th centuries. A 19th-century cellar was also identified. This probably served as a coal store.