Southmoor, Springhill, Oxfordshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: oxfordar1-287344)

Oxford Archaeology (South), 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1047588
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Oxford Archaeology (South) (2018) Southmoor, Springhill, Oxfordshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: oxfordar1-287344) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1047588

Introduction

Southmoor, Springhill, Oxfordshire. Archaeological Evaluation (OASIS ID: oxfordar1-287344)

Between 13th and 21st February 2017, Oxford Archaeology undertook an archaeological evaluation comprising 23 trenches on the site of a proposed residential development near Springhill, Southmoor, Oxfordshire (NGR SU 3897 9795).

Archaeological features were present in 13 of the 23 trenches, representing at least three phases of activity on the site.

The earliest phase dated to the Mesolithic and early Neolithic period and was indicated by a small assemblage of worked flints recovered from across the site and within treeholes.

The second phase of activity was located within the south-west of the site and comprised middle Iron Age features including a small enclosure and associated pits in Trench 2 and a dense pit cluster in Trench 7.

The third and final phase was focused in the north-east of the site and consisted of post-medieval field boundaries and a probable 19th-century building.