Extension to 23 Banbury Road, Keble College, Oxford, Oxfordshire. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: oxfordar1-313292)

Oxford Archaeology (South), 2018

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1050099
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Oxford Archaeology (South) (2018) Extension to 23 Banbury Road, Keble College, Oxford, Oxfordshire. Archaeological Watching Brief (OASIS ID: oxfordar1-313292) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1050099

Introduction

Extension to 23 Banbury Road, Keble College, Oxford, Oxfordshire. Archaeological  Watching Brief  (OASIS ID: oxfordar1-313292)

In May 2014, Oxford Archaeology (OA) undertook an archaeological watching brief at 23 Banbury Road, Oxford. The work was commissioned by Keble College in advance of the construction of an extension to the rear of 23 Banbury Road, following advice from the City Archaeologist at Oxford City Council (OCC) that a watching brief would be required. The watching brief was maintained during the excavation of strip foundation trenches and a reduced dig within the footprint of the new build. The excavation of the strip foundations revealed the natural gravels overlain by a post-glacial loess subsoil which overlies the gravel terrace upon which Oxford sits. The loess was in turn overlain by a buried topsoil deposit which was directly overlain by landscaping and bedding deposits associated with the existing car park surface. The gravel, loess and buried topsoil had been truncated by a large discrete feature which was likely to be a pit, but the function and date of the feature were unclear. The northern edge of the footprint of the new build had been subject to significant modern truncation. The reduced dig did not impact below the top of the buried topsoil horizon and no further features were observed.