The Iron Trade in England and Wales 1500-1815: the charcoal iron industry and its transition to coke: PhD Thesis, Wolverhampton University (2003)

Peter King, 2003

Data copyright © Dr Peter King unless otherwise stated


University of Wolverhampton logo

Primary contact

Dr Peter King
49 Stourbridge Road
Hagley
Stourbridge
DY9 0QS
UK
Tel: 01562 720368

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1000239
Sample Citation for this DOI

Peter King (2003) The Iron Trade in England and Wales 1500-1815: the charcoal iron industry and its transition to coke: PhD Thesis, Wolverhampton University (2003) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000239

Introduction

This thesis presents some of the conclusions of a much larger research programme into the history of the iron industry in England and Wales. Throughout most of the period with which it is concerned (1500-1815), England and Wales were politically and economically united, and need to be treated as whole. Accordingly references in this thesis to England and the adjective (English) often include Wales.

Preparation of this thesis has taken over six years and was preceded by about eight years of research with a view to producing a book (or books) on the iron industry, and also by another decade and more of intermittent research (as a hobby). This research has aimed to compile a brief history of every blast furnace, forge, steel furnace, slitting mill, and tinplate works, and of certain other kinds of iron mill operating in the 16th to 18th centuries, and to determine as far as possible its ownership, size and trading relationships.