The Small Finds and Vessel Glass from Insula VI.1 Pompeii. Excavations 1995-2006

H E M Cool, 2016

Data copyright © Dr H E M Cool unless otherwise stated


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Dr H E M Cool
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England
Tel: 0115 9819 065

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1039937
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H E M Cool (2016) The Small Finds and Vessel Glass from Insula VI.1 Pompeii. Excavations 1995-2006 [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1039937

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Overview

Loomweights

The digital collection includes the database which provides full details of the small finds and vessel glass found. It was impossible to study the iron small finds as there was a lack of X-radiograph facilities, but all of the other materials are included. The work carried out on the stratigraphic narrative to put the finds into context is also included as both a database table and a document which describes the phasing and stratigraphy in more detail. There are also three documents which provide background for the full discussion. The insula was first uncovered by two campaigns of excavations in 1770-71 and 1783-9. Appendix 1 provides transcripts of the original accounts. Appendix 2 provides a listing of all the contexts with lead slingshots. These derived from the Sullan siege of 89 BC and provide important evidence for the phasing. The third appendix provides summary tables of the eruption level assemblage of glass vessels now extant in the stores in Pompeii. This provides an important group of data of what was in use in AD 79, and allows interesting progressions in the use of glass vessels to be studied. A small number of photographs of items, that it has not been possible to illustrate in the letterpress volume, is also included.

The artefacts discussed here remain in the care of the Soprintendenza archeologica di Pompei. The paper and digital archive relating to the excavations is currently retained by the AAPP directors. (Dr Rick Jones, Department of Classics, University of Leeds and Dr Damian Robinson, School of Archaeology, Oxford).