Silbury Hill

English Heritage, 2014

Data copyright © English Heritage unless otherwise stated


English Heritage logo

Primary contact

English Heritage
Fort Cumberland
Fort Cumberland Road
Eastney
Portsmouth
P04 9LD
UK
Tel: 01793 414700
Fax: 01793 414707

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

DOIs should be the last element in a citation irrespective of the format used. The DOI citation should begin with "doi:" in lowercase followed by the DOI with no spaces between the ":" and the DOI.

doi:10.5284/1024570

DOIs can also be cited as a persistent link from another Web page. This is done by appending the DOI Resolver with the DOI. This would look like:

http://dx.doi.org/10.5284/1024570

However, if it is possible it is best to hide the URL in the href property of the <a> tag and have the link text be of the form doi:10.5284/1024570. The HTML for this would look like:

<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.5284/1024570">doi:10.5284/1024570</a>
Sample Citation for this DOI

English Heritage (2014) Silbury Hill [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] (doi:10.5284/1024570)

Introduction

General shot of Silbury Hill from the eastern bank of the Winterbourne.
Silbury Hill from the eastern bank of the Winterbourne

English Heritage has been engaged in work at Silbury since May 2000 when a vertical shaft originally dug in 1776 re-opened up on the summit. After temporary stabilisation, a major investigative programme revealed further local problems associated with lateral tunnels dug at the base of the hill in 1849 and 1968. After much public debate and scrutiny, a scheme for permanent remedial works was agreed and work was duly carried out between 2007 and 2008.

The 2007/8 recording work identified numerous phases of the mound, suggesting that the archaeological stratigraphic sequence is considerably more complex than previously thought; the mound growing through many small events, rather than a few grand statements. The digital archive reflects the work that took place from the shaft opening on the summit of the hill in 2000 to the 2007/8 excavations and the assessment and analysis stages that followed.