121 Boutport Street, Barnstaple, North Devon, Devon. Results of a Historic Building Assessment (OASIS ID: southwes1-239173)

South West Archaeology Ltd, 2017

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South Molton
Devon
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https://doi.org/10.5284/1047193
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South West Archaeology Ltd (2017) 121 Boutport Street, Barnstaple, North Devon, Devon. Results of a Historic Building Assessment (OASIS ID: southwes1-239173) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1047193

Introduction

121 Boutport Street, Barnstaple, North Devon, Devon. Results of a Historic Building Assessment (OASIS ID: southwes1-239173)

South West Archaeology Ltd. was commissioned to undertake historic building assessment at 121 Boutport Street, Barnstaple, ahead of the proposed conversion of the shop to form one dwelling and the conversion of the rear stores to form two dwellings. The building is located in Barnstaple, to the east of the High Street within the historic town and is a Grade II Listed building. Very few historic features remain inside the building and those that remain are of mid-late 19th century in date. However, embedded in the wall between this building and 122 to the west is a 16th century roof truss situated on the second floor approximately 1.5 meters below the current roof pitch. Parts of 16th century truss blades have been reused as opening lintels in the rebuilt rear wall of the building suggesting that the extension to the rear, the raising of the roof pitch, and the insertion of a chimney stack in the centre of the building were part of a rebuild of the whole structure, probably of mid-late 19th century date.