Trent Valley: Making Archaeology Matter

David Knight, Blaise Vyner, 2007

Data copyright © Dr David Knight, Blaise Vyner unless otherwise stated


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Primary contact

Dr David Knight
Head of Research
Trent and Peak Archaeology
Lenton Fields
University Park
Nottingham
NG7 2RD
UK
Tel: 0115 951 4823
Fax: 0115 951 4824

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https://doi.org/10.5284/1000196
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David Knight, Blaise Vyner (2007) Trent Valley: Making Archaeology Matter [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1000196

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Introduction

This recently published booklet aims to provide a brief introduction to the archaeological issues associated with sand and gravel quarrying in the Trent Valley, one of the major sources of sand and gravel in the UK. This booklet was developed from an idea by John Walker (York Archaeological Trust) with the support of Trent Valley GeoArcheology: a co-operative of stakeholders, including researchers, heritage managers and representatives of the minerals industry, English Heritage, Natural England, the Environment Agency, the British Geological Survey and OnTrent, convened by Mike Bishop (Nottinghamshire County Council) in 2001. It was designed and published by York Archaeological Trust, and written by David Knight (Trent & Peak Archaeology) and Blaise Vyner. It was funded by the Aggregates Levy Sustainability Fund distributed by English Heritage on behalf of Defra.

Sections are included on archaeological procedures (including preliminary assessment, evaluation, full investigation, post-excavation analysis and reporting), the range of artefacts, palaeoenvironmental material and structural remains that might be encountered during work in sand and gravel quarries, procedures when discoveries are made (including lists of contact organisations and telephone numbers), legal issues (including the Treasure Act, finds ownership and discoveries of burials and human bones) and further sources of information (including general books and key web sites).