London Square, Southwark, London. Archaeological Building Recording (OASIS ID: waterman2-259594)

Tim Murphy, 2017

Data copyright © Tim Murphy unless otherwise stated


Waterman Infrastructure & Environment Ltd (Waterman) logo

Primary contact

Tim Murphy
Waterman Infrastructure & Environment Ltd (Waterman)
Pickfords Wharf
Clink Street
London
SE1 9DG

Send e-mail enquiry

Resource identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers

Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) are persistent identifiers which can be used to consistently and accurately reference digital objects and/or content. The DOIs provide a way for the ADS resources to be cited in a similar fashion to traditional scholarly materials. More information on DOIs at the ADS can be found on our help page.

Citing this DOI

The updated Crossref DOI Display guidelines recommend that DOIs should be displayed in the following format:

https://doi.org/10.5284/1043771
Sample Citation for this DOI

Tim Murphy (2017) London Square, Southwark, London. Archaeological Building Recording (OASIS ID: waterman2-259594) [data-set]. York: Archaeology Data Service [distributor] https://doi.org/10.5284/1043771

Introduction

London Square, Southwark, London. Archaeological Building Recording (OASIS ID: waterman2-259594)

This archive includes the report and data resulting from a scheme of archaeological building recording at London Square (formerly known as Rich Industrial Estate) in Bermondsey prior to its redevelopment. The record has been undertaken commensurate with levels 1-2 as outlined by Historic England.

This aim of this scheme of building recording was to provide a sustainable record of the buildings within the Site prior to their demolition or refurbishment. The study also aimed to further understand the Site’s historic development and the phasing of the building stock.

Research revealed that the Site’s first industrial use was in the nineteenth century, prior to which it had been open agricultural land on the periphery of the settlement of London. During the nineteenth century the Site was occupied by several different tanning companies as part of one of the most prominent trades in this area. By the end of the nineteenth century, with the exception of terrace housing bounding the Site, all the buildings were under the ownership of Elizabeth Lazenby & Sons confectionery company.

The Site was later owned by Crosse and Blackwell in the 1920s when they incorporated E. Lazenby & Sons. Crosse & Blackwell owned the Site for production of their confectionery products until c.1969. Since this period the Site has been used by multiple tenanted businesses who were located in many of the former factory floors, many of which have since been sub-divided.