Monthly Archives: November 2013

Exposing the ADS… to Google

An online presence is just the tip of the ADS iceberg, but as such we still rely on search engines to direct traffic to our archived datasets and web content. Search engines are not the only way people find their way to the ADS, as we provide metadata to many aggregators and portals via OAI-PMH and SOAP web services such as the Heritage GatewayEuropeana, Thomson Reuters Data Citation IndexKeepers Registry, NERC Data Catalogue Service, and MEDIN Data Discovery Portal to name a few. Even with all of those outlets to discover ADS content, a fair share of users still come via a good ol’ Google type-and-pray search.  We are referrer agnostic at the ADS, and don’t really care how people discover our resources… so long as it doesn’t circumvent our Terms & Conditions (T&C’s).

A side note on the the ADS T&C’s, they were drafted in the early days of the web, well before the advent of the Creative Commons or other similar licencing models, and were designed to credit the creators of the data while protecting their intellectual property from uncompensated resale. It doesn’t cost anything to access or use data from the ADS as long as you agree to the ADS T&C’s, which is usually done by clicking an “Agree” button when accessing data for the first time. While at times mildly annoying, we are all lucky that the original proposal from the AHDS lawyers (requiring a signed letter from each user wanting to access ADS data…… really!) was dismissed and the infinitely more convenient click-agreement prevailed. Ultimately our T&C’s were borne out of a belief in Open Access, which has been a core tenet of the ADS philosophy since its beginnings in 1996.

Continue reading Exposing the ADS… to Google

The Value and Impact of the Archaeology Data Service: Final Report

The final report of the coequally known ‘ADS IMPACT project’, reported upon previously in this blog, is now available to download from the Jisc website. 

The Value and Impact of the Archaeology Data Service (ADS): a study and methods for enhancing sustainability was commissioned by Jisc as part of a larger study into the the value and impact of three data centres (ADS, BADC and ESDS). These assessments were undertake by Neil Beagrie of Charles Beagrie Ltd and Professor John Houghton of the Centre for Strategic Economic Studies (CSES) and a synthesis report will be available from Jisc in the near future.

Continue reading The Value and Impact of the Archaeology Data Service: Final Report

Take part in the ARIADNE Stakeholder Survey and win an iPad

ADS and the ARIADNE project consortium kindly ask you to participate in an online-survey about data access in archaeological research. With your support, we will be able to bring archaeological information systems a step forward.

The survey is aimed at:

  • researchers in archaeology
  • directors of archaeological research institutes
  • managers of digital data repositories

The survey explores user requirements, current practices, and gaps with regard to the access to research data in archaeology. Answering the questionnaire will approximately take 20 minutes. The questionnaire is available at: http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/1405631/ARIADNE-Stakeholder-Survey
The survey will run until 31st December 2013.

Participate and win an iPad: With a bit of luck, you can win one of two iPads (or other tablet computers – depending on the winner’s choice), which will be raffled off among all the survey respondents.

Feel free to forward this information to colleagues in your research institute who are also welcome to participate in the survey.

Three New Yorkshire Archives

ADS is pleased to announce the release of three new digital archives exploring the history of settlement in Yorkshire, carried out under the auspices of the University of York.

The first, ‘Burdale: an Anglian settlement in the Yorkshire Wolds‘ by Julian Richards and Steve Roskams, comprises a broad range of primary and secondary data derived from fieldwork and post-excavation analysis of the site.The aims of the projects were to:

  • establish the depth, extent and survival of archaeological deposits
  • explore the nature of sedimentation
  • identify the extent of the 8th and 9th century activity
  • establish the relationship of the metalwork finds and the features
  • collect environmental & artefactual samples
  • determine the nature of activity on site
  • help protect the site from illegal metal-detecting

The release of this archive coincides with the release of a Data Paper on the data set in our sister service Internet Archaeology. This Data paper highlight the reuse potential of the archive.

The second and third new digital archives are related to fieldwork undertaken within the parish of Cottam. Continue reading Three New Yorkshire Archives