All posts by Katie Green

Christmas Competition

snowy-trowel

ADS and Internet Archaeology are teaming up again this year to provide you with the opportunity to win one of our much sought after trowel-shaped usb sticks!

To be in with a chance to win, just find one or more Christmas baubles hidden on the ADS or Internet Archaeology websites and tell us the location (web address) by emailing help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk  or by private messaging @ADS_Update or @IntarchEditor on Twitter.

Every correct entry received will be entered into a prize draw to be held on Monday 4th January 2016. There are 6 different baubles to find so each individual can enter the draw  a maximum number of 6 times. (i.e. you can’t submit more than one entry per bauble location).

The competition is now closed.

Happy bauble hunting!

baubles

We are now please to be able to announce the winner of our Christmas competition was Rachael Nicholson! Congratulations Rachael, your new usb stick is in the post.

 

 

ADS a Recommended Repository for Nature Publishing Group

ADS are very pleased to announce that we are now an officially recommended repository for Nature Publishing Group’s open access data journal Scientific Data. ADS joins approximately 80 other data repositories, representing research data from across the entire scientific spectrum. ADS has been approved by Scientific Data as providing stable archiving and long-term preservation of archaeology data.

SciData_new_logo_22

Scientific Data offers a new article type, the ‘Data Descriptor’, which has been specifically designed to publish peer-reviewed research data in an accessible way, so as to facilitate its interpretation and reuse. Publishing Data Descriptors enables data produces and curators to gain appropriate credit for their work, whilst also promoting reproducible research.  The main goals of this journal are tightly aligned with that of ADS, focusing on making the data publicly accessible and encouraging re-use.

data descriptor

By becoming a recommended repository for Scientific Data, we are now not only a recommended repository for archaeological data accompanying articles published by the Nature Publishing group but researchers now have the opportunity to deposit archaeological data to ADS, whilst submitting an Data Descriptor to Scientific Data.

All depositors depositing with ADS and intending to publish in Scientific Data or another Nature Publishing Group journal must choose to disseminate the data they are depositing with us under a CC-BY liecence. For more information contact the ADS at help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk

 

 

 

We have a winner! Digital Data Reuse Award 2015

Internet Archaeology and the Archaeology Data Service are pleased to announce the winner of our 2015 Digital Data Reuse Award.

The award was instigated to recognise the outstanding work being carried out through the re-use of digital data and raise awareness of the research potential of data re-use in archaeology and beyond.

The winner  receives the opportunity to publish free of charge in Internet Archaeology, and all the finalists will receive a certificate and one of our coveted trowel-shaped USB sticks.

Find out about the winner, the finalists and the highly commended entries below!
Continue reading We have a winner! Digital Data Reuse Award 2015

Digital Data Re-use Award 2015

Internet Archaeology and the Archaeology Data Service have teamed up to provide an Award that recognises the outstanding work being carried out through the re-use of digital data.

The Digital Data Re-use Award offers people the chance to promote their work and win the opportunity to publish, free of charge, in the premier open access journal Internet Archaeology.

This Award is intended to:
  • acknowledge the wide range of research carried out that re-uses data hosted at the ADS
  • raise awareness of the research potential of data re-use in archaeology and beyond
  • raise the winners profiles amongst peers
  • assist the winners career development

The top 3 entries will receive one of our coveted 1GB trowel-shaped USB sticks, a certificate of accomplishment, and will be invited to publish their case studies in the ADS blog SoundBytes.
Continue reading Digital Data Re-use Award 2015

OUT NOW: Dendrochronological Data in Archaeology

For a great deal of human history, wood has been an important construction material and remnants of ancient wood are preserved to this day in archaeological sites on land and under water, as well as in buildings and mobile heritage.

Old School Cottage, Bayton, Worcestershire: Section of joist with 132 rings (in a distance of 8 cm), 1378-1509 (Vernacular Architecture 27, p. 91).
Old School Cottage, Bayton, Worcestershire: Section of joist with 132 rings (in a distance of 8 cm), 1378-1509 (Vernacular Architecture 27, p. 91).

Dendrochronology is an important tool in cultural-heritage research  to determine the exact calendar age of ancient wood. Such age determinations contribute significantly to assessments of the meaning of archaeological and architectural structures in terms of their chronological and cultural context.
Continue reading OUT NOW: Dendrochronological Data in Archaeology

Coming Soon: Dendrochronological Data in Archaeology Guide to Good Practice!

DCCD_HiResADS and the Digital Collaboratory for Cultural Dendrochronology are pleased to announce that a new Guide to Good Practice on Dendrochronological Data in Archaeology will be available soon.

The guide will ariadneprovide good-practice guidance for the collection and archive of dendrochronological data in the context of archaeological and historical research. The guide is aimed at both those creating dendrochronological datasets, and those that commission dendrochronological analyses. This guide will not cover the methods involved in dendrochronological analyses, but focuses on how to describe and archive the digital data and metadata involved in these analyses.

The guide will be available soon on the Guides to Good practice website, and it’s release will be announced on the ADS website, so keep a look out for the announcement.

Old School Cottage, Bayton, Worcestershire: Section of joist with 132 rings (in a distance of 8 cm), 1378-1509 (Vernacular Architecture 27, p. 91).
Old School Cottage, Bayton, Worcestershire: Section of joist with 132 rings (in a distance of 8 cm), 1378-1509 (Vernacular Architecture 27, p. 91).

Continue reading Coming Soon: Dendrochronological Data in Archaeology Guide to Good Practice!

Tell us your ORCID!

ADS and Internet Archaeology have been integrating ORCID iDs to archives and articles for a while now, and with over 1.3 million ORCID iDs issued we are sure some of our previous depositors and authors have now registered. By telling us your ORCID iD we can link to your ORCID record from our ADS archive pages and Internet Archaeology articles.

Tell us your ORCID iD by emailing help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk

If you don’t already have an ORCID iD why not register today!

Read ADS Director Julian Richards reasons for registering for a ORCID ID here.
orcid-logo

What is ORCID?

ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes an individual from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submissions, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that all your work is recognized.

In other words, ORCID does for people what Datacite and Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) do for online resources.  It is supported by some major research organisations, libraries, and publishers, including the California Digital Library, CERN, Cornell University, Elsevier, MIT, Nature Publishing Group, Thomson Reuters, The Welcome Trust, and Wiley Blackwell.

 ORCID is a free service and it is surprisingly easy to register for an ORCID ID. Indeed, it takes about 30 seconds, and then it is equally easy to add information about publications and funded research projects. As soon as you have registered ORCID will use automated tools to make suggestions of publications and data sets drawn from the databases of CrossRef, Datacite, Europe PubMed CentralScopus and other services.

Then don’t forget to tell ADS by emailing help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk so we can update your records!

 

You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past competition

What is archaeology?logo_nearch_small

An adventure?

A pain in the neck?

The appeal of the past?

The magic of marvelous sites?

A dusty museum?

Probably all of these together, and still more.

Up until 31 July 2015, all European citizens can answer the question and tell us about their idea of archaeology by entering a drawing, painting, photo or video in the European competition “You(r) Archaeology”. The competition is open to all citizens of the EU and includes a special section for children (0-12 years).
Continue reading You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past competition

DADAISM Project

DADAISM

The DADAISM project brings together researchers from the diverse fields of archaeology, human computer interaction, image processing, image search and retrieval, and text mining to create a rich interactive system to address the problems of researchers finding images relevant to their research.

In the age of digital photography, thousands of images are taken of archaeological artefacts. These images could help archaeologists enormously in their tasks of classification and identification if they could be related to one another effectively. They would yield many new insights on a range of archaeological problems. However, these images are currently greatly underutilized for two key reasons. Firstly, the current paradigm for interaction with image collections is basic keyword search or, at best, simple faceted search. Secondly, even if these interactions are possible, the metadata related to the majority of images of archaeological artefacts is scarce in information relating to the content of the image and the nature of the artefact, and is time intensive to enter manually.
Continue reading DADAISM Project