Category Archives: Audience and Usage

The PUBLICAN project

Internet Archaeology and the Archaeology Data Service are working together on a project concerning the current and ongoing impact of our activities on publication policy and practice (which we are calling PUBLICAN for short). We’re especially interested in the impact digital archiving and publication has had on the commercial sector.

Can you help us to compile a national picture of how digital has changed and affected professional practice?

Some further background information to the project can be found in this recently recorded Archaeology Podcast Network podcast https://www.archaeologypodcastnetwork.com/arch365/118

And the survey itself (short!) can be found here:

http://intarch.ac.uk/projects/publican/

Last orders? … The survey link will be closed on 30th June.


Halfway House at Gweedore, Co. Donegal, probably by Robert French
c.1884. National Library of Ireland on The Commons, Ref.: L_ROY_01372.
No known copyright restrictions

Built Legacy: Preserving Historic Buildings Data

By Angela Creswick

Responding to concern that there may be gaps in the recording of investigations and sustainable archiving of digital data and reports on standing buildings, the ADS has embarked on a five-month project funded by an External Engagement Award from the University of York to research current practice and user needs of conservation architects, surveyors, engineers and their specialist teams.
Continue reading Built Legacy: Preserving Historic Buildings Data

British and Irish Archaeological Bibliography Survey Results

The British and Irish Archaeological Bibliography is moving from the Council of British Archaeology to the ADS in 2016. The idea is to integrate it with other ADS Library resources like the Library of Unpublished Fieldwork Reports (aka the Grey Literature Library).

The first step in this change was a user needs survey to investigate who is using BIAB in its current form and which other bibliographic tools the historic environment community are using in their research.
Continue reading British and Irish Archaeological Bibliography Survey Results

ADS a Recommended Repository for Nature Publishing Group

ADS are very pleased to announce that we are now an officially recommended repository for Nature Publishing Group’s open access data journal Scientific Data. ADS joins approximately 80 other data repositories, representing research data from across the entire scientific spectrum. ADS has been approved by Scientific Data as providing stable archiving and long-term preservation of archaeology data.

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Scientific Data offers a new article type, the ‘Data Descriptor’, which has been specifically designed to publish peer-reviewed research data in an accessible way, so as to facilitate its interpretation and reuse. Publishing Data Descriptors enables data produces and curators to gain appropriate credit for their work, whilst also promoting reproducible research.  The main goals of this journal are tightly aligned with that of ADS, focusing on making the data publicly accessible and encouraging re-use.

data descriptor

By becoming a recommended repository for Scientific Data, we are now not only a recommended repository for archaeological data accompanying articles published by the Nature Publishing group but researchers now have the opportunity to deposit archaeological data to ADS, whilst submitting an Data Descriptor to Scientific Data.

All depositors depositing with ADS and intending to publish in Scientific Data or another Nature Publishing Group journal must choose to disseminate the data they are depositing with us under a CC-BY liecence. For more information contact the ADS at help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk

 

 

 

Tell us your ORCID!

ADS and Internet Archaeology have been integrating ORCID iDs to archives and articles for a while now, and with over 1.3 million ORCID iDs issued we are sure some of our previous depositors and authors have now registered. By telling us your ORCID iD we can link to your ORCID record from our ADS archive pages and Internet Archaeology articles.

Tell us your ORCID iD by emailing help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk

If you don’t already have an ORCID iD why not register today!

Read ADS Director Julian Richards reasons for registering for a ORCID ID here.
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What is ORCID?

ORCID provides a persistent digital identifier that distinguishes an individual from every other researcher and, through integration in key research workflows such as manuscript and grant submissions, supports automated linkages between you and your professional activities ensuring that all your work is recognized.

In other words, ORCID does for people what Datacite and Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) do for online resources.  It is supported by some major research organisations, libraries, and publishers, including the California Digital Library, CERN, Cornell University, Elsevier, MIT, Nature Publishing Group, Thomson Reuters, The Welcome Trust, and Wiley Blackwell.

 ORCID is a free service and it is surprisingly easy to register for an ORCID ID. Indeed, it takes about 30 seconds, and then it is equally easy to add information about publications and funded research projects. As soon as you have registered ORCID will use automated tools to make suggestions of publications and data sets drawn from the databases of CrossRef, Datacite, Europe PubMed CentralScopus and other services.

Then don’t forget to tell ADS by emailing help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk so we can update your records!

 

Digital Data Re-use Award

Internet Archaeology and the Archaeology Data Service have teamed up to provide an Award that recognises the outstanding archaeological research being carried out through the re-use of digital data.

The Digital Data Re-use Award offers archaeological researchers the chance to promote their work and win the opportunity to publish, free of charge, in the premier open access journal Internet Archaeology.
Continue reading Digital Data Re-use Award

Marie Curie post doctoral fellow Fabrizio Galeazzi joins ADS and the Centre for Digital Heritage

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Fabrizio 3D laser scanning at Las Cuevas site, Chiquibul Reserve (Belize).

This term ADS are pleased to welcome Fabrizio Galeazzi, a new Marie Curie post doctoral fellow, who will be working with us and the Centre for Digital Heritage.

Fabrizio comes to York having received a BA and MA in Archaeology at the University of Rome “La Sapienza”, specializing in Late Antiquity and Medieval Archaeology, and completing a Ph.D. in World Cultures/Heritage at the University of California, Merced. Fabrizio’s doctoral research investigated the potential use of 3D technologies for the analysis and interpretation of archaeological and heritage sites and how 3D documentation technologies, such as laser scanning and dense stereo matching techniques, are changing archaeological excavation practices.
Continue reading Marie Curie post doctoral fellow Fabrizio Galeazzi joins ADS and the Centre for Digital Heritage

Will the real Julian Richards please stand up?

JulianI regularly suffer from cases of mistaken identity. It’s just as well that my namesake “Meet the Ancestors” Julian Richards and I get on well, as we regularly receive emails intended for the other person. I am often invited to lead tour groups to Stonehenge, whereas I’m sure he must have been tempted to head off to Denmark on more than one occasion. Admittedly the popularity of BBC TV’s Blood of the Vikings deepened the confusion, and I have been asked several times to help arrange for a DNA test by someone convinced of their Viking ancestry, often on the basis of their blond hair, blue eyes, and bad temper. Even academic library catalogues can get it wrong, attributing books about Stonehenge to me, and those about computers to him. It’s not that I’m particularly precious about this – although on one occasion the look of disappointment on the face of the chairman of a local archaeological society when I walked through the door was palpable: “You’re not at all what you look like on the television” – but this begins to matter when research profile depends upon citations and bibliometric statistics. Continue reading Will the real Julian Richards please stand up?

ADS-easy; our first archive is delivered!

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Site of the former NXP works in Southampton

 

We were very pleased to recently release our first archive which was deposited with us via ADS-easy. Oxford Archaeology (South) deposited a small archive of the digital outputs of a trial trench evaluation on the site of the former NXP Works in Southampton, Hampshire, on behalf of CgMs Consulting prior to the redevelopment of the site by Canmoor Projects Ltd. The work took place in March 2013 and the archive deposited with the ADS in accordance with instructions from Southampton Arts and Heritage.

Continue reading ADS-easy; our first archive is delivered!

Persistence in Preservation and Publication of Data

To recognise the effort that authors make in order to deposit digital data and to get academic credit for that effort, Internet Archaeology (IA) and the ADS have established an open access data paper series. ‘Data papers’ maximise a dataset’s re-use potential and help to improve the preservation and the publication of data and are a valuable addition to the advancement of archaeological research. However IA and ADS have now taken the concept a little further.

In order to identify the content and provide a persistent link to its location on the Internet, each data paper in IA and the corresponding archive in ADS are assigned unique DOIs (Digital Object Identifiers, issued via CrossRef and DataCite). The introduction of these unique digital identifiers has been a major advancement for persistence in data preservation, publication and citation, but our approach has been to extend them to a more granular level. While an ADS dataset is assigned a ‘top level’ DOI, additional identifiers to specific sections of the data area have also been allocated. This enhances the archive not just by enabling direct access to a subset of data but also allows those sub-sections, often authored by specialist researchers, to be citable in their own right and gives recognition to the individuals who undertook the work e.g. see Richards & Roskams (2013) archive: where the Geophysical Survey, the Field-walking Survey and Animal Bone reports all have their own DOI. There is no limit to the granulation possible and we envisage usage right down to individual digital objects, such as a photograph or a GIS shapefile, when their importance to a hypothesis is apparent. Such use of DOIs will greatly benefit archaeological research, providing greater transparency in archaeological reporting and improving research efficiency.

Continue reading Persistence in Preservation and Publication of Data