Category Archives: Internet Archaeology

Internet Archaeology Goes Fully Open Access

Internet Archaeology is pleased to announce  that it has become a fully open access journal.

ia-logo
From this month Internet Archaeology’s 130 institutional subscribers from the UK, USA, Australia and Europe will no longer have to pay the £160 a year subscription and the £7 charge for individual articles is also being scrapped, making Internet Archaeology one of the first journals to transition from a subscription model to full open access. Several things have spurred this decision.
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Will the real Julian Richards please stand up?

JulianI regularly suffer from cases of mistaken identity. It’s just as well that my namesake “Meet the Ancestors” Julian Richards and I get on well, as we regularly receive emails intended for the other person. I am often invited to lead tour groups to Stonehenge, whereas I’m sure he must have been tempted to head off to Denmark on more than one occasion. Admittedly the popularity of BBC TV’s Blood of the Vikings deepened the confusion, and I have been asked several times to help arrange for a DNA test by someone convinced of their Viking ancestry, often on the basis of their blond hair, blue eyes, and bad temper. Even academic library catalogues can get it wrong, attributing books about Stonehenge to me, and those about computers to him. It’s not that I’m particularly precious about this – although on one occasion the look of disappointment on the face of the chairman of a local archaeological society when I walked through the door was palpable: “You’re not at all what you look like on the television” – but this begins to matter when research profile depends upon citations and bibliometric statistics. Continue reading Will the real Julian Richards please stand up?

CAA 2014 Paris

The department of archaeology on rue Michelet, Paris
The impressive exterior of the department

The annual CAA (Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology) conference took place in the impressive surroundings of the Sorbonne. The Archaeology Data Service and Internet Archaeology were very well represented throughout the 4 days of the conference.

 

Day One 22nd April 2014

Partners from the ARIADNE project came together in Paris in the ARIADNE Workshop on On-line Resources chaired by ADS’s Catherine Hardman. The workshop introduced archaeological researchers to a variety of on-line data resources, including those held by the three partners providing on-line access to their data as part of the EC Infrastructures funded Advanced Research Infrastructure for Archaeological Dataset Networking (ARIADNE) project.

The partners were the Archaeology Data Service (ADS), ARACHNE at the German Archaeological Institute (DAI), and Fasti Online at the International Association of Classical Archaeology (AIAC). In addition to the ARIADNE partners, the workshop featured a presentation on data and data integration in the Digital Archaeological Record (tDAR). tDAR is an international digital repository based in America for the digital records of archaeological investigations.

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Persistence in Preservation and Publication of Data

To recognise the effort that authors make in order to deposit digital data and to get academic credit for that effort, Internet Archaeology (IA) and the ADS have established an open access data paper series. ‘Data papers’ maximise a dataset’s re-use potential and help to improve the preservation and the publication of data and are a valuable addition to the advancement of archaeological research. However IA and ADS have now taken the concept a little further.

In order to identify the content and provide a persistent link to its location on the Internet, each data paper in IA and the corresponding archive in ADS are assigned unique DOIs (Digital Object Identifiers, issued via CrossRef and DataCite). The introduction of these unique digital identifiers has been a major advancement for persistence in data preservation, publication and citation, but our approach has been to extend them to a more granular level. While an ADS dataset is assigned a ‘top level’ DOI, additional identifiers to specific sections of the data area have also been allocated. This enhances the archive not just by enabling direct access to a subset of data but also allows those sub-sections, often authored by specialist researchers, to be citable in their own right and gives recognition to the individuals who undertook the work e.g. see Richards & Roskams (2013) archive: where the Geophysical Survey, the Field-walking Survey and Animal Bone reports all have their own DOI. There is no limit to the granulation possible and we envisage usage right down to individual digital objects, such as a photograph or a GIS shapefile, when their importance to a hypothesis is apparent. Such use of DOIs will greatly benefit archaeological research, providing greater transparency in archaeological reporting and improving research efficiency.

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The Internet Archaeology of the ADS

While rationalising old and orphaned files on the ADS servers, I stumbled upon an old index.html file for a previous version of the website.  Similar to discovering a long forgotten photograph in the attic, this led me down the meandering path of memory lane.  However unlike a photograph, reconstructing the look and feel of a web page requires some fiddling to correctly associate the style sheets and any server side includes.  After a few cut and paste commands replacing server side includes with actual HTML and a directory search for the missing stylesheet, the old homepage was back up again in all of its glory.

ADS homepage c. 2008.

Even though I spent my first four years at ADS using this homepage it looked totally foreign to me.  The structure was confused, the javascript unnecessary and the style was uninspired.  The page was functional, but left a lot to be desired compared to the structure and clarity of the present version. The backend framework and systems that make up the current website also make it manageable and easy to update, compared to the organic, disjointed structure of the previous website which led to headache inducing updates as seemingly insignificant modifications led to unanticipated bugs (or features depending on your preferred coping mechanism).
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Open Access Week at ADS and Internet Archaeology

ADS and Internet Archaeology have been taking part in Open Access Week. Open Access Week is an international event now where the academic and research community can  to help inspire wider participation in Open Access by sharing information, events and ideas.

What Is Open Access?

“Open Access” to information  is the free, immediate, online access to the results of scholarly research, and the right to use and re-use those results as you need.

In celebration of Open Access Week ADS has been releasing a new archive every day! And Internet Archaeology has gone totally open access for the week!

ADS and Internet Archaeology have also been participating by publishing the following blog posts on the Open Access Week website advertising our Open Access content and initiatives.

Neil Gevaux’s Day of Archaeology at the ADS and Internet Archaeology

Working at the ADS & Internet Archaeology

I have been working at the University of York since November 2012, as the holder of a one-year IFA/HLF Workplace Learning Bursary. My days here are often split between tasks for the Archaeology Data Service (ADS) and the e-journal Internet Archaeology.

Work for the journal can involve proof-reading articles for publication, looking at proposals and writing HTML mark-up in order to prepare the articles for online publication. This really helps you get to grips with what the authors put across, and because of the electronic nature of the journal, it’s amazing to see the innovative ways that data and concepts can be presented. Whereas traditional print journals are confined mainly to text and images, Internet Archaeology regularly deals with animations, videos, 3D visualisations and other media, which all comes together to provide some really rich, interesting content.
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