Category Archives: Prizes

Christmas Competition

snowy-trowel

ADS and Internet Archaeology are teaming up again this year to provide you with the opportunity to win one of our much sought after trowel-shaped usb sticks!

To be in with a chance to win, just find one or more Christmas baubles hidden on the ADS or Internet Archaeology websites and tell us the location (web address) by emailing help@archaeologydataservice.ac.uk  or by private messaging @ADS_Update or @IntarchEditor on Twitter.

Every correct entry received will be entered into a prize draw to be held on Monday 4th January 2016. There are 6 different baubles to find so each individual can enter the draw  a maximum number of 6 times. (i.e. you can’t submit more than one entry per bauble location).

The competition is now closed.

Happy bauble hunting!

baubles

We are now please to be able to announce the winner of our Christmas competition was Rachael Nicholson! Congratulations Rachael, your new usb stick is in the post.

 

 

We have a winner! Digital Data Reuse Award 2015

Internet Archaeology and the Archaeology Data Service are pleased to announce the winner of our 2015 Digital Data Reuse Award.

The award was instigated to recognise the outstanding work being carried out through the re-use of digital data and raise awareness of the research potential of data re-use in archaeology and beyond.

The winner  receives the opportunity to publish free of charge in Internet Archaeology, and all the finalists will receive a certificate and one of our coveted trowel-shaped USB sticks.

Find out about the winner, the finalists and the highly commended entries below!
Continue reading We have a winner! Digital Data Reuse Award 2015

Digital Data Re-use Award 2015

Internet Archaeology and the Archaeology Data Service have teamed up to provide an Award that recognises the outstanding work being carried out through the re-use of digital data.

The Digital Data Re-use Award offers people the chance to promote their work and win the opportunity to publish, free of charge, in the premier open access journal Internet Archaeology.

This Award is intended to:
  • acknowledge the wide range of research carried out that re-uses data hosted at the ADS
  • raise awareness of the research potential of data re-use in archaeology and beyond
  • raise the winners profiles amongst peers
  • assist the winners career development

The top 3 entries will receive one of our coveted 1GB trowel-shaped USB sticks, a certificate of accomplishment, and will be invited to publish their case studies in the ADS blog SoundBytes.
Continue reading Digital Data Re-use Award 2015

You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past competition

What is archaeology?logo_nearch_small

An adventure?

A pain in the neck?

The appeal of the past?

The magic of marvelous sites?

A dusty museum?

Probably all of these together, and still more.

Up until 31 July 2015, all European citizens can answer the question and tell us about their idea of archaeology by entering a drawing, painting, photo or video in the European competition “You(r) Archaeology”. The competition is open to all citizens of the EU and includes a special section for children (0-12 years).
Continue reading You(r) Archaeology – portraying the past competition

On the 12th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

a windswept Bronze Age site,

        a dig team in the office,  an icy Roscommon Castle, a Temple to Saturn, Christmas jumpers in the lab, a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,   a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

H_Spencer_Carter

This  image was submitted by Spencer Carter of a site hoped to be Mesolithic, but turned out to be Bronze Age, Where have we heard that before…?

Related resources (if it was Mesolithic…!)

Mesolithic themed issue in Internet Archaeology

Paul R. Preston 2009 ‘Cache and Carry: lithic technology and Mesolithic mobility’, Internet Archaeology 26. DOI: 10.11141/ia.26.25

Gaffney, V. et al. 2013 ‘Time and a Place: A luni-solar ‘time-reckoner’ from 8th millennium BC Scotland‘, Internet Archaeology 34. DOI: 10.11141/ia.34.1

On the 11th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

a dig team in the office,

          an icy Roscommon Castle, a Temple to Saturn, Christmas jumpers in the lab, a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,   a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

T_WAScotland (2)

T_WAScotland

These photos were submitted by the team from Wessex Archaeology Scotland. It looks there was partaking of mulled wine somewhere along the way!

Related resources

Possible alcohol consumption noted in Pottery consumption and cultural change from M. Pitts 2006 ‘Consumption, deposition and social practice: a ceramic approach to intra-site analysis in late Iron Age to Roman Britain’, Internet Archaeology 21.

On the 10th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

an icy Roscommon Castle,

           a Temple to Saturn, Christmas jumpers in the lab, a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,   a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

F_Frank_Scott_via ireland fieldwork

Frank Scott submitted this image via Facebook of  Roscommon Castle, Ireland. It made a particularly striking panorama when cropped.

Related resources

Castles come in all sorts of shapes and sizes. Some are even virtual! J. Huggett and C. Guo-Yuan 2000 ‘3D Interpretative Modelling of Archaeological Sites/A Computer Reconstruction of a Medieval Timber and Earthwork Castle’, Internet Archaeology 8.

On the 9th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

a Temple to Saturn,

           Christmas jumpers in the lab, a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,   a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

H_Massimo_Brando5

Massimo Brando submitted this excellent image of the snow frosted Temple of Saturn in Rome.

Related resources

For more on Rome’s temples, see N. Terrenato et al. 2012 ‘The S. Omobono Sanctuary in Rome: Assessing eighty years of fieldwork and exploring perspectives for the future‘, Internet Archaeology 31.

Or dip your toes into maritime Rome with the evolution of Rome’s maritime facade: archaeology and geomorphology at Castelporziano archive.

On the 8th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

Christmas jumpers in the lab,

           a snowy Silbury Hill, two ‘geofizzing’ students, a snow covered Castle Hill, a  sweeping  digger  in  the snow,  a  frosty  Grimspound,  a  Lewis  chess  piece,  and  a  snow capped Avebury.

T_VLeQuelenec

Jumpers from Jersey! Viki Le Quelenec submitted this image from Jersey Heritage of their staff in festive Christmas outfits – the one on the right is an interesting take on the usual festive greeting!

Related resources

Some of the most exciting archaeological work is done in the lab post-excavation, whether we’re wearing Christmas jumpers or not.  See To Block Lift or not to Block Lift? An Experiment at the Early Mesolithic Site of Star Carr, North-East Yorkshire, UK in Internet Archaeology 28.

Or for something slightly warmer! You might want to consider AustArch: A Database of 14C and Luminescence Ages from Archaeological Sites in Australia.

 

On the 7th Day of Christmas…

The competition gave to me …

a snowy Silbury Hill,

   two ‘geofizzing’ students, a  snow covered Castle Hill,  a sweeping digger in the snow,  a frosty Grimspound, a Lewis chess piece, and a snow capped Avebury.

H_Paul_Adams1

This photo was submitted by Paul Adams our ultimate competition winner, but it was such a great image of Silbury Hill we had to include this in our 12 days of Christmas as well.

Related resources

If you want to find out more about Silbury Hill, the digital archive for the Silbury Hill Conservation Project contains data created over 12 years from a desk-based assessment in 2000 to the recent remedial works in 2007/2008.