Crone, A. and Campbell, E., (2005). A crannog of the first millennium AD. Edinburgh: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.

Title
Title
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Title:
A crannog of the first millennium AD
Subtitle
Subtitle
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Subtitle:
excavations by Jack Scott at Loch Glashan, Argyll, 1960
Pages
Pages
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Number of Pages:
176
Downloads
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DOI
DOI
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DOI
Publication Type
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Monograph Chapter
Author
Author
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Author:
Anne Crone
Ewan Campbell
Publisher
Publisher
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Publisher:
Society of Antiquaries of Scotland
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2005
Source
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Source:
biab_online
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URL: http://www.socantscot.org/partnumber.asp?cid=&pnid=116851
Created Date
Created Date
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Created Date:
10 Feb 2011
Chapter Title Sort Order Both Arrows Access Type Author / Editor Page
Start/End Sort Order Up Arrow
Abstract
Jon C Henderson
20 - 24
Coleen E Batey
68 - 69
Effie Photos-Jones
68 - 71
Clare Thomas
72 - 81
Robert Lewis
81 - 85
Bernard Meehan
85 - 92
Ann Clarke
92 - 104
Coleen E Batey
105 - 108
Anita Quye
135
Effie Photos-Jones
135 - 138
Effie Photos-Jones
138 - 141
Effie Photos-Jones
141 - 143
Full publication of the site, including detailed specialist reports on the artefact assemblage. Includes a discussion of dating which concludes that there were up to four episodes of activity: in the second to fourth centuries AD; in the late-sixth to seventh centuries; in the eighth to ninth centuries; and a final, non-occupational, use by occupants of the fourteenth-century settlement on a nearby island.