J. Winters, ed., (2001). Internet Archaeology 10. York: Council for British Archaeology.

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Internet Archaeology 10
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Internet Archaeology
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10
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Editor:
Judith Winters
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Council for British Archaeology
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2001
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The British & Irish Archaeological Bibliography (BIAB)
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URL: http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue10/jeffrey_index.html
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21 Nov 2001
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Abstract
Stuart Jeffrey
Discusses the problem of presenting three dimensional models of monumental stones in their landscape contexts. Special attention is paid to the difficulty of capturing landscape detail, interactivity, reconstructing landscapes and providing accurate representations of landscapes to the horizon. Also features the example of The Jordanhill Cross from the Govan Old Parish Church, Glasgow.
Julian D Richards
Presents the results of fieldwork carried out between 1993--95, including fieldwalking, geophysical survey and excavation. This revealed an enclosure of the eighth--ninth centuries, containing traces of a small number of post-built halls. In the late-ninth century this settlement was abandoned, a process which led to the incorporation of a human female skull in a domestic rubbish pit. A new enclosed settlement was laid out nearby, which was occupied briefly in the early-tenth century. It is argued that the Anglian settlement may have been part of a royal multiple estate but that, as a result of estate reorganisation after the Scandinavian settlement, it developed into an independent manor.