J. Kenny, ed., (2004). Internet Archaeology 17. York: Council for British Archaeology.

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Internet Archaeology 17
Series
Series
The series the publication or report is included in
Series:
Internet Archaeology
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
17
Downloads
Downloads
Any files associated with the publication or report that can be downloaded from the ADS
Downloads:
DOI
DOI
The DOI (digital object identifier) for the publication or report.
DOI
Publication Type
Publication Type
The type of publication - report, monograph, journal article or chapter from a book
Publication Type:
Journal
Editor
Editor
The editor of the publication or report
Editor:
Jon Kenny
Publisher
Publisher
The publisher of the publication or report
Publisher:
Council for British Archaeology
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2004
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
The British & Irish Archaeological Bibliography (BIAB)
Related resources
Related resources
Other resources which are relevant to this publication or report
Relations:
URL: http://intarch.ac.uk/journal/issue17/index.html
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
05 Sep 2005
Article Title Sort Order Both Arrows Access Type Author / Editor Page
Start/End Sort Order Up Arrow
Abstract
Peter Popkin
0
Zooarchaeological procedure for recording butchery marks and other types of bone modification involves drawing the bone showing the exact location and orientation of the modification, and recording all of the information about the bone and its modification into an electronic database. No recording templates have been published, however, resulting in individual zooarchaeologists repeating the effort of developing their own templates or drawings for each bone in an assemblage showing a modification. To help alleviate this problem a series of caprine (sheep and goat) bone templates have been created, showing every bone in a goat skeleton, apart from the skull, from six views at life-size when printed on A4 paper. They have been produced with a minimum of detail so that the recorded butchery marks and bone modifications will be clearly visible. Because the skeletal morphology of sheep and goats is so similar these templates may be used interchangeably for either species. They may also be used for many other artiodactyl species such as cattle and deer as no scale has been indicated. Includes
0
0
Gail Falkingham
0
Grey literature is examined, with specific reference to unpublished reports literature produced in the present climate of developer-funded archaeology in England. The vast majority of reports are word-processed and then printed in hard-copy format for limited distribution. The original, digital document however, has largely been seen as a by-product. Electronic means of delivery and dissemination via the World Wide Web offer huge potential and present opportunities for new ways of working. The use of XML technology appears to offer many advantages over traditional formats, such as word-processed, PDF and even (X)HTML files, particularly with regard to the manipulation and presentation of encoded electronic text. Increasingly, XML technology is being used for electronic delivery and dissemination and the pros and cons of so doing are discussed in this article. This theme has been developed by the author through a 'proof of concept' practical case study of three unpublished grey literature archaeology reports from the North Yorkshire Historic Environment Record. XML documents have been created from the original word-processed electronic reports by the manual application of XML markup, the methodology for which was devised following the XML version of the Text Encoding Initiative's TEI P4 Guidelines. The level of detail to which the reports' structure and content has been encoded has been influenced principally by a review of user needs identified by recent national surveys and the potential for export of data for the population of other heritage datasets. Through the application of CSS and XSL stylesheets, the case study demonstrates how the reports and their content may be displayed in different ways and how selected data may be extracted from the text for input into other systems, such as Historic Environment Records and the OASIS Project database.
Steven Willis
0
Study directed towards making the best use of samian evidence as a key resource for exploring a range of questions in Roman archaeology. The study collates a large body of data and applies hitherto under-utilised methods in an endeavour to extract archaeological information from this material, particularly in the key areas of dating, the social distribution of samian and cultural practice. One avenue in respect of dating has been to explore the extent to which trends in the composition of groups of samian, in terms of forms present, may be used as a guide towards establishing the date of a group without having to depend heavily upon the dating of stamps and diagnostic decorated sherds, which may be comparatively rare. The resulting guide is intended to be an accessible and straightforward tool for the non-specialist user. The project aimed to move beyond the essential role of samian in providing `dates', to exploit its potential for elucidating aspects of cultural and economic life during the Roman era. Findings from analyses undertaken in a series of such areas are presented, including the nature of samian supply to Britain. One finding was that the collected data demonstrate how the character of site samian assemblages is strongly related to site type, status, function, exchange connections and identity. Previous work for the project has indicated that the incidence of samian is often patterned. The present study further defines the extent to which there are 'normal patterns' (or parameters) of samian occurrence by time, region and site type. A framework guide to the 'normal patterns' identified by the project, and with which specific site assemblages and stratified groups can be compared, is presented. Project objectives and discussion of findings are integrated with the present general research aims in the study of the Roman era in Western Europe. Includes
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
Penelope M Allison
Andrew S Fairbairn
Steven J R Ellis
Christopher W Blackall
0
`Engendering Roman Spaces' is a research project concerned with using artefact assemblage analyses to better understand spatial and gender relationships in the early Roman Empire and to produce more engendered perspectives of Roman society. The paper discusses the methodology and analyses being used in the project to investigate social behaviour within Roman military forts and fortresses of the first and second centuries CE through analyses of the spatial distribution of artefacts at these sites. The processes involved include digitising previously published maps and artefact catalogues from Roman military sites to create searchable databases and GIS maps. They also include the classification of the artefacts according to a number of functional and gender-associated categories (combat equipment, male and female dress, toilet etc) so that the spatial distributions of the relevant activities can be plotted. This data is then used to interpret the spatial relationships of these activities and the people involved in them. The double legionary fortress of Vetera I, on the Lower Rhine, has been used to exemplify these processes. The paper includes descriptions of the methods and software employed in the digitisation of relevant published material, the formation of relational databases, and the importation of data and of site maps into a GIS programme. To illustrate these processes and to present some of the results, the paper also includes a number of examples of the analyses carried out, together with interactive GIS maps of these analyses. Includes glossary.