n.a., (2007). Sutton Common. York: Council for British Archaeology.

Title
Title
The title of the publication or report
Title:
Sutton Common
Subtitle
Subtitle
The sub title of the publication or report
Subtitle:
the excavation of an Iron Age `marsh-fort'
Series
Series
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Series:
Council for British Archaeology Research Reports
Volume
Volume
Volume number and part
Volume:
154
Pages
Pages
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Number of Pages:
260
Downloads
Downloads
Any files associated with the publication or report that can be downloaded from the ADS
Downloads:
RR154.pdf (13 MB) : Download
DOI
DOI
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DOI
Publication Type
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Monograph Chapter (in Series)
Abstract
Abstract
The abstract describing the content of the publication or report
Abstract:
The volume describes the results of the large-scale excavations undertaken at Sutton Common in South Yorkshire, one of the best-known Iron Age multivallate sites in lowland Britain, between 1998 and 2003, which provided insights into the function and meaning of this fourth-century BC `marsh-fort'. The excavations exposed nearly the complete interior of the site, and uncovered a great part of the extensive ditch and bank defences. The excavations were part of a project which aimed to ensure the sympathetic management of the site, and included high-resolution hydrological monitoring of the water table and its effect on the archaeological burial environment, educational activities, and engagement with a range of other stakeholders, in particular the local community. An earlier phase of activity comprised a small mortuary enclosure; a single burial of pyre debris was dated to the Early Bronze Age. The main part of the fort comprised a D-shaped enclosure occupying the whole of the main island, surrounded by a box rampart, inner ditch, palisaded bank, outer ditch, and further elaborations of the defences. Two gatehouses, one facing east and the other west, provided the only access. The western gateway could only be reached by a causeway across the wetlands; a cross-bank and additional bank-and-ditch arrangements controlled access to the causeway. The integrated dendrochronological and radiocarbon analysis dated the onset of construction of the defences to 372BC. The limited items of material culture associated with the marsh-fort were all recovered from the ditch terminals of the east-facing entrance; these were accompanied by animal bones, two human crania and the only samples of yew wood found on site. These are interpreted as forming part of a structured deposition. The interior of the fort was dominated by four-post structures; some 150 granaries, ordered in rows of up to eight structures, occupied the site. In several instances charred grain was found in the postholes, and is interpreted as evidence of structured deposition during construction. No other structures were identified, and palaeoenvironmental studies indicate that the site was never inhabited. A second phase of activity within the interior was identified and dated provisionally to the fourth to second century BC. This phase comprises twelve enclosures of basic geometric shape, between 3m and 6m across, defined by narrow, steep ditches. It is suggested that these acted as `temenos' or sacred places where the ashes or pyre debris were scattered as part of mortuary rituals. This interpretation offers an evidence-based explanation for the lack of material evidence for Middle Iron Age cemetery remains in Britain and western Europe. Sutton Common is described in the volume as a place where the social identity of the local community was reinforced through the construction of the physical representation of the idea of community. The short-lived nature of the site is explained by its symbolic role, although the site's continued importance is indicated by its re-use in mortuary rituals over the following centuries. Includes French and German summaries. Separately authored contributions include
Issue Editor
Issue Editor
The editor of the volume or issue
Issue Editor:
Robert Van de Noort
Henry H P Chapman
John Collis
Publisher
Publisher
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Publisher:
Council for British Archaeology
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
The year the book, article or report was published
Year of Publication:
2007
ISBN
ISBN
International Standard Book Number
ISBN:
9781902771700
Figure/Plate/Table/Ref
Figure/Plate/Table/Ref
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Figure/Plate/Table/Ref:
Figure:    Plate:    Table:    Ref:
Source
Source
Where the record has come from or which dataset it was orginally included in.
Source:
The British & Irish Archaeological Bibliography (BIAB)
Related resources
Related resources
Other resources which are relevant to this publication or report
Relations:
URL: http://new.archaeologyuk.org/full-list-of-publications
Created Date
Created Date
The date the record of the pubication was first entered
Created Date:
30 Oct 2007
Chapter Title Sort Order Both Arrows Access Type Author / Editor Page
Start/End Sort Order Up Arrow
Abstract
0
K Miller
Robert Van de Noort
1 - 4
Henry H P Chapman
4 - 9
Robert Van de Noort
9 - 15
Henry H P Chapman
Robert Van de Noort
15 - 19
I Carstairs
K Miller
Henry H P Chapman
Robert Van de Noort
20 - 21
Robert Van de Noort
21 - 25
James L Cheetham
25 - 32
Ian Panter
Robert Van de Noort
32 - 33
I Carstairs
Robert Van de Noort
33 - 34
I Chapman
Robert Van de Noort
35 - 36
Henry H P Chapman
Robert Van de Noort
36 - 38
Henry H P Chapman
Robert Van de Noort
38 - 40
Henry H P Chapman
40 - 41
Allan R Hall
Harry Kenward
41
Andrew W Payne
41 - 42
Henry H P Chapman
42
G Thomas
42 - 44
Derek Hamilton
Benjamin R Gearey
Gordon T Cook
Christopher Bronk-Ramsey
Peter D Marshall
Robert Van de Noort
44 - 48