n.a., (1980). Archaeology in Essex to AD 1500.

Title
Title
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Title:
Archaeology in Essex to AD 1500
Series
Series
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Series:
Council for British Archaeology Research Reports
Volume
Volume
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Volume:
34
Downloads
Downloads
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Downloads:
cba_rr_034.pdf (8 MB) : Download
DOI
DOI
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DOI
Publication Type
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Monograph (in Series)
Abstract
Abstract
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Abstract:
An introductory paper by R H Allen and R G Sturdy (1-7) outlines the environmental background, geological history, and changes in vegetation and climate. J J Wymer (8-11) summarizes the main finds of Clactonian, Acheulian, and Levalloisian industries. The Upper Palaeo is not well represented; R Jacobi (12-13) considers isolated Late Glacial artefacts, and in a second paper (14-25) describes the Early Meso assemblages (particularly from Hillwood and White Colne) and major collections of Late Meso artefacts; non-microlithic equipment is illustrated as well as microliths. J D Hedges (26-39) collates information for Neo monuments and material culture, with a gazetteer of pottery-producing sites; there are several possible cursus monuments and small henges, and the Stour valley emerges as an important region during Late Neo. C R Couchman (40-6) offers a preliminary study of recorded evidence for BA settlement: EBA-MBA material had a riverine and coastal distribution, and LBA is additionally represented by metalwork concentrated around the Thames. P J Drury (47-54) surveys the Early and Middle Iron Age; hillfort occupation was largely replaced by oppida in late IA, and a trend from open to enclosed settlement occurred during the period, with a tendency to rectangular houses. A tentative framework for the development of IA ceramics is offered. C F Hawkes (55-8) identifies Caesar's 'maritime states' as the Trinovantes, seen as originating from Gaul (Ambiani) c 150 BC with appropriate equipment (chiefly swords, coins, and pottery). P J Drury and W Rodwell (59-75) discuss evidence for five aspects of Iron Age-RB settlement, arguing for landscape continuity between the two; military occupation, 'small towns', rural settlement, and the 'end' of Roman Essex are also treated. The development of Colchester from Roman times to the Norman conquest is discussed by P Crummy (76-81): he notes 5th-8th century occupation, a possible period of desertion 750-900, and reoccupation, first by Danes and finally by English in 0th century. M U Jones (82-6) reviews the Essex evidence for early Saxon rural settlement, and then concentrates on the evidence from Mucking of pottery, metalwork, and buildings. A catalogue of twenty-nine early Saxon cemeteries in Essex is provided by W T Jones (87-95). Mid-Saxon features at Wicken Bonhunt were excavated by K Wade; they represented a well-organised settlement of at least two phases with twenty-eight structures, using imported wares, and undergoing two later replannings (96-102). Certain features of the medieval landscape are surveyed by O Rackham, finding RB or even EIA origins and continuity of use from then on (103-7). C A Hewett (108-12) considers AS carpentry techniques, which displayed features and concepts which were archaic rather than crude; he lists Saxon/Saxo-Norman joints. A survey of twenty-four towns with urban status in the Middle Ages is given by M R Petchey (113-17), noting three phases of foundation - pre conquest, 12th century castle towns, and market-dominated towns of 1180-1260, many exhibiting evidence of deliberate planning. W Rodwell (118-22) discusses ecclesiastical sites and structures in Essex from Asperiodon, and K C Newton (123-5) evaluates the archaeological potential of four classes of archives. M C Wadhams (126-30) stresses the need for specialist knowledge and expertise in interpreting late vernacular architecture, and considers some specific recent research. D G
Issue Editor
Issue Editor
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Issue Editor:
David G Buckley
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
1980
ISBN
ISBN
International Standard Book Number
ISBN:
0 900312 83 1
Locations
Locations
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Locations:
Location - Auto Detected: Colchester
Location - Auto Detected: Essex
Location - Auto Detected: Wicken Bonhunt
Location - Auto Detected: Stour
Location - Auto Detected: Hillwood
Locations
Locations
Any locations covered by the publication or report. This is not the place the book or report was published.
Subjects / Periods:
Temporal - Auto Detected: Middle Iron Age
Temporal - Auto Detected: Norman
Temporal - Auto Detected: Gaul Ambiani C 150 Bc
Temporal - Auto Detected: Medieval
Temporal - Auto Detected: Saxon
Temporal - Auto Detected: Roman
Temporal - Auto Detected: Ad 1500
Temporal - Auto Detected: Pre Conquest 12th Century
Figure/Plate/Table/Ref
Figure/Plate/Table/Ref
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Figure/Plate/Table/Ref:
Figure:    Plate:    Table:    Ref:
Note
Note
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Note:
Date Of Issue From: 1980
Source
Source
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Source:
British Archaeological Abstracts (BAA)
Related resources
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Relations:
URL: http://new.archaeologyuk.org/full-list-of-publications
Created Date
Created Date
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Created Date:
05 Dec 2008