Buteux, S. and Chapman, H. H P., (2009). Where Rivers Meet.

Title
Title
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Title:
Where Rivers Meet
Subtitle
Subtitle
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Subtitle:
The archaeology of Catholme and the Trent-Tame confluence
Series
Series
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Series:
Council for British Archaeology Research Reports
Volume
Volume
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Volume:
161
Downloads
Downloads
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Downloads:
RR161.pdf (50 MB) : Download
DOI
DOI
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DOI
Publication Type
Publication Type
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Publication Type:
Monograph Chapter (in Series)
Author
Author
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Author:
Simon Buteux
Henry H P Chapman
Year of Publication
Year of Publication
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Year of Publication:
2009
ISBN
ISBN
International Standard Book Number
ISBN:
9781902771786
Source
Source
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Source:
biab_online
Related resources
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Relations:
URL: http://new.archaeologyuk.org/full-list-of-publications
Created Date
Created Date
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Created Date:
29 May 2013
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Abstract
This book is the story of an area of landscape in the English Midlands from earliest prehistory to around AD 900. Although it looks like a typical rural landscape, archaeological research, much of it in advance of quarrying, has revealed that this area has a long and remarkable history of occupation stretching back to the Ice Age. In particular, at Catholme the project has revealed monuments from the Neolithic and Bronze Age so spectacular they would have been comparable with sites such as Stonehenge and Durrington Walls. The project has brought together all the previous research for the area to create a full history for this important landscape, which remains under threat from quarrying. The book also looks at the various archaeological techniques used to explore the landscape, from the usual aerial photography, geophysical prospection and excavation, to more recent techniques such as LiDAR and the potential of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to manipulate and present the data. Written in an accessible style and extensively illustrated in colour, this book examines the archaeology of a little-known area of the English Midlands, but presents ground-breaking research into prehistory, which will be of interest to archaeologists, students and local people. The book will also appeal to anyone with an interest in the wider landscape of the Midlands, from prehistory almost to the Norman Conquest.